TRACY THOMASON - SYMBOLS, SIGNS AND SIGNALS, MARINARO

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Tracy Thomason, A Well and a Wealth or a Spine and it's Center, 2016

Tracy Thomason, A Well and a Wealth or a Spine and it's Center, 2016

Tracy Thomason, Batter Your Breasts With Your Fists, 2017

Tracy Thomason, Batter Your Breasts With Your Fists, 2017

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education understood to include everything that happens to us from the moment we enter this world of meaningful symbols, signs, and signals. – Linda Nochlin

Marinaro is pleased to present Tracy Thomason’s first New York solo exhibition, a series of textural paintings built from the slowness and layering of classical painting and sculptural material.

In Thomason’s work, paint and marble dust are hand-mixed into a clay-like material and carefully applied to linen surfaces. Layered in sequence with surgical precision, a mottled rocky ground forms over time, revealing themselves to have more in common with something remembered from the Cave of Forgotten Dreams or a chunk of washed up rubble on the beach.

The artist’s mark fluctuates between the quick stabs of stone carving tools, knife slices, and the gentle insistence of a powdery drawn line. Sculpted abstract glyphs are applied in meditation, snapping the works into graphic clarity from one painting to the next, developing an economy of form as language. These paintings are meant to be read in addition to being felt.

Thomason's paintings begin to mirror themselves through the doubling of form and
imagery. Drawing attention to the relationship between forms and negative space, denser shapes often reference the female body or summon nocturnal landscapes. Where one asserts itself as something of the corporeal, the same form acts as a period at the end of a sentence—a black hole to absorb your gaze. Flat color is a pause for contemplation and remembrance, reminding you where you are located.

Occupying a physical space the scale of a modest bathroom mirror or that of an oversized newspaper unfolded in completion, suggests the importance of looking and how to experience the world around us. In the 1970’s informational text, ‘Our Bodies, Ourselves’, women were encouraged to use a hand mirror as an exploratory tool, ‘take a mirror and examine yourself, after all you are your body and you are not obscene.” 

Tracy Thomason - Symbols, Signs and Signals
MARINARO, November 17 - December 22
www.marinaro.biz

Contribution by Timothy Hull. 

Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Vitaly Bezpalov, Represented as fleeing, for he has laid sacrilegious hands on the object once hallowed by life, 2017

Vitaly Bezpalov, Represented as fleeing, for he has laid sacrilegious hands on the object once hallowed by life, 2017

Lucia Leuci, Senza titolo creolo, 2017

Lucia Leuci, Senza titolo creolo, 2017

Michele Gabriele, Sleepy Spoony (Why don’t you go back to sell your fucking shaboo and leave us alone?), 2017

Michele Gabriele, Sleepy Spoony (Why don’t you go back to sell your fucking shaboo and leave us alone?), 2017

Dorota Gaweda & Egle Kulbokaite, YGRG 145, 2017

Dorota Gaweda & Egle Kulbokaite, YGRG 145, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, It was right / Even though it felt wrong, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, It was right / Even though it felt wrong, 2017

Alessandro Di Pietro, Bruce, 2017

Alessandro Di Pietro, Bruce, 2017

Jibril Esposito, Doublepenetration, 2017

Jibril Esposito, Doublepenetration, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Inspired by the documentation modality used to describe an art work through its details, “Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage” is a project anchored to the idea that the Minor Circumstance of such images often exhibits the most material and fulfilling aspect of the object, letting visual pleasure have the best on the imaginary / imaginative concept of the artwork.
Obliged to relate to a restricted space, cynically sensual already, seven artists dialogued with the exhibition space cannibalizing an aesthetic that we all know and which we has been influenced and sometimes distracted in these years.
The hateful, common, coarse, and deplorable mistakes that inspired this project are essentially two: How does an installation view reveal of the project, the curatorial thought, and the gallerist ambitions? And how often does it only show the depressing interior designer ability of the curator and the proud complacency of rampant estate owner?
And when it comes to the artist: sure to choose from the dozens of photos of details the one that can best express the concept of the work, he is instead distracted as a child by the twinkle of a chromed metal, excited by the curve of a a form that reminds us some car advertising.
The art works are the center of any topic that interests art, but they are often misunderstood and then chosen for the most simplistic and approximate reasons.
The operation is simple and mocking. The viewer is made responsible.
Will he stop on a superficial and consolatory reading? Let him. Everything is in order and prepared for this to happen, because he does not bother too much and convinces himself that everything is fine.
Perhaps he would prefer to feel cuddled by those images he recognizes and loves. That he needs.
Satisfying and feticist images.

”A motorcycle continuously multiplies itself in all this shining and noise, capable of taking on new parts that are willing to be absorbed, and expanding itself to an unknown extent. But given this expansion, does the motorcycle remain what it used to be before? […]
If Thumbelina had to travel not on the back of the swallow but by a motorcycle, she would have hardly managed to keep her wedding dress and her tiny bows unrumpled. […]
The mutation can escalate to such an extent as to make it impossible to tell whether it is a parasitic outgrowth, hiding among the parts of the vehicle, or a vehicle that has become a parasitic virus of a weird shape that eludes the logic of functional driving.
It has become impossible to separate the parts from their bearer, because the bearer is now little more than a sum total of its constituent parts assembled in a somewhat random manner. The infinite expansion and annexation of yet more parts prompts an incessant renewal of the entire body. We are no longer sure which point in time and space we should select in order to be able to give a proper name to whatever it is that we are facing. […]
Will the multiplication of these surfaces and of their shine turn into the multiplication of their deceptions?
Or, taken to extremes, thus will detonate the logic of the vehicle from within, unleashing the powers previously hidden inside? Thumbelina landing happily on her swallow next to an elvish prince notices a brand new bike behind his back.”
(Natalya Serkova)

Dangerous double curve, the first to the left.

Curated by Something Must Break.
Exhibiting artists: Monia Ben Hamouda, Vitaly Bezpalov, Alessandro Di Pietro, Jibril Esposito, Michele Gabriele, Dorota Gaweda & Egle Kulbokaite, Lucia Leuci.

Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage
November 14
 

MATT CONNORS - HOCKET, CANADA

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For his fifth exhibition at the gallery and second on Broome Street, Connors has altered the gallery floor plan into four equal but open quarters. The paintings are held in specific groups while at the same time these added walls create overlapping perspectives and the possibility for non linear encounters.

The term ‘hocket' refers to a spasmodic or interrupted effect produced by dividing a melody between two parts, notes in one part coinciding with rests in the other.  Similarly, Connor’s installation continually shifts our vista of the paintings, dismantling the notion of the center, and allowing the viewer to experience the paintings as events as well as images.

Many of the works draw from personal collections of gifts, records, artworks and books amassed in the artists studio. These stacks are abstracted by color and recast into drawing, with essentially found composition. The resulting paintings are as much views to the artists thoughts as riffs on how we see and feel real and imagined spaces. One composition that repeats in a number of paintings (“Hocket”, “After Hocket (Gold)” and “Hocket Study”), is a still life derived from one of these stacks of personal objects and other artworks. Conveying a warmth beyond the logic of their formal aesthetics, these paintings are an index of what matters most to the artist’s life.

Matt Connors - Hocket
CANADA, October 20 - December 10
www.canadanewyork.com

JONAS WOOD - INTERIORS AND LANDSCAPES, DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY

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David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to announce Interiors and Landscapes, an exhibition of new work by Jonas Wood. The show, which will take place across all three of the gallery’s exhibition spaces, will open on November 3 and remain on view through December 16, 2017. An opening reception will be held on Friday, November 3 from 6:00pm until 8:00pm. The 13 paintings on view, large-scale canvases dedicated to interior and landscape scenes, provide evidence of significant advances in Wood’s technical approach to composition and color. They also showcase his unique ability to communicate emotional depth, humor, and an immersive sense of place. This exhibition solidifies Wood’s position as one of the most important Los Angeles-based painters working today, and as a key inheritor of several lineages of American figurative painting.


Interior and landscape genres have been constant sources of inspiration for Wood since the beginning of his career, generating pictures rendered in oil and acrylic that are among his most ambitious and complex. These works encompass all of the characteristic elements of his vocabulary: surprising perspectival shifts, collage-like disjunctions, dense visual patterning, and gestures that occupy a porous terrain between figuration and abstraction. While the new paintings demonstrate increased formal sophistication––in particular, Wood’s command of subtle tonal variation is on full display, with narrow ranges of colors sensitively handled to depict spatial depth and natural textures––they also shed light on underlying themes that can be found throughout this facet of his oeuvre. Wood’s use of teeming detail, for example, often serves the paradoxical purpose of capturing the feeling of empty spaces; many of his works in these typologies are notable for their conspicuous lack of people, even when they highlight the remnants of human presence.


In Shio’s Studio on Blackwelder, Wood captures the workspace of his wife, the ceramic sculptor Shio Kusaka, not in a state of bustling activity, but at a moment when everything has been packed away in a multitude of cardboard boxes. An image of a woman appears in a photograph, but otherwise the composition hinges upon things that are hidden from sight, so that the eye sifts through Wood’s careful handling of whites, browns, and greys, reveling in many variants of painterly invention achieved with limited means. Even the concrete floor becomes a micro-composition in and of itself, with lozenge-shaped splotches and irregular lines animating the bottom section of the canvas. The concrete blocks that occupy its upper half, by contrast, function as playful bouts with an idealized grid, executed with a combination of precision and looseness that charges them with energy.


Since he often focuses on familiar spaces in which he or his friends and family have lived or worked, Wood’s paintings are frequently suffused with the melancholic light of memory. But as he explores and reinvents their details in paint, these spaces––as well as the things in them––come alive in new ways. Seen up close, the surfaces of the work are filled with countless instances of pinpoint illumination. This vivid intensification of ordinary life, carried forth through attention to color and paint handling, situates Wood as an inheritor of the legacies of artists like David Hockney, Alex Katz, and Alice Neel, whose generous, accessible, and stylized renditions of reality heat their subjects up or cool them down depending on the desired effect.


Some of Wood’s images, on the other hand, have their origins in books, magazines, television broadcasts, or movies. Yet even when he works from found rather than personal sources, he fosters a level of immediacy that makes his images read as though they were born of his own experience. Such is the case with Romancing the Stone, a painting inspired by the 1984 action/romance film of the same name. Here, a lush mountainscape provides the opportunity for Wood to exercise his unparalleled facility with foliage, one of the hallmarks of his work across all typologies. A focused range of greens and blues, applied in controlled dabs, establishes a dense visual field that covers the majority of the canvas and threatens to subsume a small bus depicted making its way through the jungle. Wood provides a wholly contemporary take on Romantic landscape painting, synthesizing popular culture, dramatic extremes of scale, and an almost naïve sense of wonder.


Scholl Canyon 2, another landscape, features a view of a golf course punctuated by antennae and a cell tower. The sky above it is divided into large rectangular areas, each tinted a different shade of grayish blue; while these divisions result from Wood’s use of collaged photographs as studies for his paintings, they enable a degree of abstraction––and moody ambience––reminiscent of Richard Diebenkorn’s mid-career landscapes and cityscapes, and in turn, the chromatic experiments of Matisse. (Elsewhere, Matissean forms make a more overt cameo in the interior Helen’s Room, appearing on posters hanging on a bedroom wall.) In works like these, the material world is constructed from color; flat shapes are torqued, stacked, and juxtaposed to create expansive volumes; and Wood channels the fullness of everyday life with economy and a masterfully light touch.

Jonas Wood - Interiors and Landscapes
David Kordansky Galley, November 3 - December 16
www.davudkordanskygallery.com

ANDREW BIRK - I AM THE BODY OF A HUMAN, MALTA CONTEMPORARY ART

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I am the body of a human is a self-referential declaration spoken from the voice both of a cyborg and a caveman: the condensed self-awareness of an existentialist being, a self-aware physical device, and a biological entity, all at once. 

Andrew Birk presents a series of Life Shrouds, an exercise of dirt-on-denim pieces made with the imprint of his own body. Coming from a trajectory of painting, exploring materials in relation to their common use, Birk turns to the most primordial tool, subject and material - the body and what it is surrounded by, what it is made of. A body that is neither a medium, like a brush operating between the gesture and the image, nor a portrait of a subject. These paintings are multiple indexes of one same reference, a physicality in movement: each the unpredictable product of an alive, perfect machine. 

In the age of immateriality being the untraceable source of all images created, distributed, manipulated and consumed; where bodies are self-governed as brands; where truth only exists as an effect and nature as a concept - these imprints appear, much like X-rays do, as a deconstruction of content and form, a rejection of image making and identity masking. 

Dirt is pigment and denim is canvas; dirt is body and denim is labour. Stripping down art history’s canons and praising the unrefined, Birk uses wearable, industrial cloth, to cover himself covered in mud. As in a death shroud, body and dirt become one thing in a cycle of both scientific and religious undertones. Beyond the anthropocentric and constructed distinction between artificial and natural, human beings appear as an undivided species within a larger system of entities, living in a world of structures - biological, social, linguistic. Seen as accumulations of materials formed and solidified through time, historical narratives then become geological, and humans, made from synthetic processes and constantly provoking new ones, like rocks and plants and bacteria, become a planetary force. 

The organic body is a temporary coagulation in a current - birth captures a certain fraction of the current and death lets it go again when it is disintegrated by microorganisms into a range of new prima materia. Everything from the narratives of mankind formed in clay, to the technological extensions of its reach, is analogous - A.I. development imitates the strategies and patterns of primitive organisms, religious wars dictate migratory flows and with them, genetic mutation of societies and ecosystems. 
Andrew Birk’s imprints are made away from both the romanticization of Nature as the Other, and from the dynamics of capitalization of an ecological attitude. 

Apantles, Calderones, Tlalpan, Juantepec, Chipicas are the names of biographically relevant places, where the artist finds the dirt that he turns into paint, where he recovers mud from lakes or where he has his weight dragged onto the canvas across grassed fields. 
Andrew Birk’s Life Shrouds are one’s own size and one’s own vigour, as the sum of particles that constitute a mass is the potentiality of a Self, as the captured moment in time of an ever mutating anatomy; as the place where the implications of being human start and end. 

Text by Sira Pizà Airas.

Andrew Birk - I am the Body of a Human
Malta Contemporary Art - October 21 - November 18
www.maltacontemporaryart.com

Ricardo Passaporte - Employee of the Month, Ruttkowski;68

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Passaporte loves to paint under pressure. While his site-specific works are a result of fast-paced production, he strives to search for perfection in his work on canvas. 

The artist’s body of work is deeply engaged with the history of Pop, underscoring the evolving relationship between art and commerce as well as articulating the parallels between graffiti’s custom of tagging and the same repetitive, identity-driven practise of the corporate logo. By appropriating these logos as his artistic tag, Passaporte disrupts the relationship between brand and consumer.

Of particular interest to the artist is the unpicking of the visual identity of global supermarket giants LIDL and Tesco. By experimenting with enlarging or scrambling details of the chains’ logos until they reach various levels of abstraction. The works make visible the uncanny ability of global corporations to claim ownership of even the simplest visual markers: notably the three primary colours, red, yellow and blue. 

In his first solo exhibition with Ruttkowski;68 entitled: Employee Of The Month, Ricardo Passaporte shows a variety of new works on canvas as well as a site-specific installation featuring the iconic LIDL bags.

Ricardo Passaporte - Employee of the Month
Ruttkowski;68, October 13 - November 19
www.ruttkowski68.com

THE LOBSTER LOOP - MONITOR

ANDREIA SANTANA, Installation view with Rigatino and Tratteggio, 2017

ANDREIA SANTANA, Installation view with Rigatino and Tratteggio, 2017

TOMASO DE LUCA, Cokehead, 2017

TOMASO DE LUCA, Cokehead, 2017

Installation view at The Lobster Loop, MONITOR Lisbon

Installation view at The Lobster Loop, MONITOR Lisbon

Installation view at The Lobster Loop, MONITOR Lisbon

Installation view at The Lobster Loop, MONITOR Lisbon

ANDRÉ ROMÃO, Upper torso, 2017 (Detail)

ANDRÉ ROMÃO, Upper torso, 2017 (Detail)

TOMASO DE LUCA, Falling, 2017

TOMASO DE LUCA, Falling, 2017

TOMASO DE LUCA, Cokehead, 2017

TOMASO DE LUCA, Cokehead, 2017

ANDRÉ ROMÃO, Upper torso, 2017 (Detail)

ANDRÉ ROMÃO, Upper torso, 2017 (Detail)

MONITOR Lisbon has the pleasure to announce its next exhibition, The Lobster Loop featuring works by Tomaso de Luca, André Romão and Andreia Santana, opening on 29th September, until 18th November 2017.
The exhibition will debut new works by the three artists. The invitation was proposed due to the common ground of the three artists, which often deal with sculptural practices that come from an investigation through human aspects and sciences, reflecting on economical, cultural and political systems in a contemporary context.
The Lobster Loop appears from an e-mail exchange by the artists, imagined as a fictitious post-apocalyptical dive bar set in a dystopian future. In this fictional future, the artists develop a practice “in context” where the works are inscribed as possible artefacts, tools and memorabilia. The Lobster Loop exists in a reality where time, genetics, gender, politics and economics are dissolved.
The exhibition will also feature a text by Sofia Lemos, inspired by the artists’ exchange based on counter-historiographic and speculative history-writing methodologies.
This exhibition will unveil the main intentions for MONITOR in Lisbon, having an experimental and fresh approach, investing in young art practices and establishing connections between Rome and Lisbon’s art scenes. 

Exhibiting artists: André Romão, Andreia Santana, Tomaso de Luca.
Photos by Marco Pires.

The Lobster Loop
MONITOR, September 29 - November 18
www.monitoronline.org

ARTISSIMA'S 2017 EDITION WITH ILARIA BONACOSSA.

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Artissima is Italy’s most important contemporary art fair. Since its establishment in 1994, it has combined the presence of an international market with a focus on experimentation and research.Nearly two hundred galleries from around the world participate every year. In addition to the fair, Artissima is also composed of three art sections, headed by a board of international curators and museum directors, devoted to emerging artists, drawings and rediscovering the great pioneers of contemporary art. Aujourd'hui spoke with its new director Ilaria Bonacossa to know more about this year's edition. 

First of all, can you tell us a little bit about yourself? Who is Ilaria Bonacossa?
I am a curator who has studied art history first and then curatorial studies in New York. I have worked in museums preparing shows of Italian and international emerging artists, and I am always involved in the conception and production of new shows and installations, so the gallery world is not new to me. In fact when you work with emerging talents galleries are crucial partners, so a fair is not such a big leap away from my institutional career. Also my first significant work position was as curator at Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Torino; working with an important and cutting-edge collection, I learned a lot about the mechanisms of the art world.

Now you are Artissima's new Director! What can you tell us about this year's Edition?
One goal of the 2017 edition is to investigate Artissima’s links and relationships with the city of Torino. This year we decided to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Arte Povera, which began in 1967, by creatively re-enacting two particular experiences of those years, the Piper Club of Torino and the Deposito d’Arte Presente (1967–68), a space of production and display of the works of emerging (later Arte Povera) artists organised by Gian Enzo Sperone with the backing of a series of local collectors. Artissima retrieves that format, with the Deposito d’Arte Italiana Presente (which I curated with Vittoria Martini), shifting it into the present time and using it as a conceptual framework for a project that absorbs the operative modes of the original. The Deposito installed inside the fair will be a large art warehouse and not really an exhibition space, but a place to trigger a narration on the last 20 years of Italian art, to capture its present developments and understand its future trends. The Deposito becomes a place of study and discovery for curators, collectors and art lovers.

We have also previously spoken with João Mourão and Luís Silva about the new section Disegni which is a great addition to Artissima. What else is new? How will this year be different from previous editions?
I am very proud of the talks programme of PIPER. Learning at the discotheque coordinated by “the classroom,” (a centre of art and education directed by Paola Nicolin). The project develops from reflections on the Piper Club in Torino, a discotheque designed by Pietro Derossi with Giorgio Ceretti and Riccardo Rosso, which became a popular venue from 1966 to 1969. Transforming the provincial atmosphere of a “dance hall” into a self-managed cultural centre, the Piper set a precedent on an international level for non-institutional spaces focusing on contemporary art. Many eclectic and creative personalities frequented the Piper in Torino, including Michelangelo Pistoletto, Alighiero Boetti, Piero Gilardi, Mario and Marisa Merz, Gianni Piacentino, Patty Pravo, the Living Theater, Carmelo Bene, Pietro Gallina, gathering and working together across disciplines, identities, codes, languages and behaviours. An evocative reconstruction of the place is proposed, a classroom-disco created in collaboration with the art group Superbudda and the furniture company Gufram, for the faithful reproduction of chairs created by Derossi for the Piper Club, based on the original drawings (1966). The programme opens with a course taught by the artist Seb Patane, and continues with lectures and talks on contemporary artistic production and sound, and video intermissions by the Torino-based art collective Superbudda.

Artissima has made an international reputation and is also known for showing both "emerging and mid-level" galleries and artists that are very exciting to discover. However, in the last few years this tier of galleries seems to have been suffering financially, with many closing their doors or giving up on the traditional art fair circuit, while alternative projects that are not necessarily "satellite" fairs have been emerging and growing (for example CONDO). Is this something that is on your mind? How can an art fair like Artissima cater to these needs, attract galleries and help them fight these difficulties?
Yes, the speculation on art and the general focus on modern art and the secondary market have put galleries that are involved in sustaining artistic research and artists’ careers under a lot of pressure, and we are all very worried, because I think the phenomenon of closings might continue to spread. Urban events like gallery weekends or experiments like Condo are very interesting, and they address the idea of de-intermediation which is now a global phenomenon. But I am not so sure about how sales have responded, and in both cases they cater to a network of already active galleries. What Artissima can do is instead to discover new players, and through the work of the curatorial teams invite galleries because of the quality of the art they show and not their status in the art world.

You were previously working as a Curator for Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo and then artistic director of Villa Croce, a public contemporary art museum. How is this different from your role in Artissima, and how are you able to play such different roles? 
I am convinced (good or bad as it may be) that there are not two different art worlds, one the institutional museum, with critics and curators, and another structured around art fairs and galleries: it is all one complex system that develops like a rhizome. Art fairs have become more important, in some ways replacing the global biennial art tour, since they offer a snapshot of the art world in a few days and all in one place, with new proposals that can even be challenging in some ways to the status quo – at least at Artissima, I hope. Publicly active collectors and their private museums have radically changed the art world and fairs respond in some way to the need of these figures to write their own art history. On the other hand, I am still a curator who is interested in the quality and challenging vision of art works, and supporting galleries that help artists develop their work is the real goal of Artissima, not chasing a market that sees art as a form of speculation.

For more information about Artissima please visit www.artissima.it

 

TERESA BRAULA REIS - WHITE HELMET, BAERT GALLERY

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Installation view, Teresa Braula Reis, White Helmet, Baert Gallery

Teresa Braula Reis Helmet #2, 2017

Teresa Braula Reis

Helmet #2, 2017

Teresa Braula Reis Helmet #2, 2017

Teresa Braula Reis

Helmet #2, 2017

Teresa Braula Reis If only I could stay (protective boots), 2017 

Teresa Braula Reis

If only I could stay (protective boots), 2017 

Teresa Braula Reis draws attention to the often overlooked affinity between construction and destruction. Her work envisages the building not simply as a site of stability, but of mutability. The notion of temporality, and with that obsolescence, assume significance in her careful considerations of the structures she inhabits. In her first solo show White Helmet, Braula Reis presents installation, sculpture, video, and image transference prints that delve into different aspects of decay, precarity, and shaky ground as related to the built environment. With these themes in mind, she reveals the slippage, similarity, and overlap between these realms.

The concrete block structure at the center of the gallery, fabricated to resemble a construction site, forms the conceptual linchpin of White Helmet. This piece, The Passing Hour, is destined for wreckage, wherein the work will partially self-destruct in a live performance at the exhibition opening. During this event, specialized materials used in the construction of the wall will expand, causing tiny cracks to form on the concrete, leading slabs to fall and break off in pieces. As the very composition of this façade drives the concrete to break, the wall becomes its own downfall. The collection of shards and dust will remain intact throughout the run of the show, as both evidence of this performance and the transience of our surroundings. Contemplating the fragility of our environment here, we are reminded of our own human fallibility.

In Rising Column, A Sense of Absence, the artist presents a three-sided wood mold that resembles the pillar structures that hold up buildings. Her iteration, however, is merely a partial replica of this form, an unfinished section of scaffold. Typical pillar form works are filled with concrete, and enclosed with wood on all sides. These concrete and wooden pillars are the elements that support the weight of a building and when that cracks, the building breaks. Braula Reis presents her form work in fragment form—an echo, or an etch of the bona fide structure. Sans concrete and gaping from one side, viewers may grasp the shoddiness of this support. At the same time, Braula Reis also dwells on the form work as a site of potential. The intricacy of this piece manifests in the way that the shapes of the surrounding slats of wood imply the missing components. What is there is just as important as what is not.

Braula Reis’ suite of concrete cast construction helmets explore related motifs. These concrete replicas represent the accouterment of the construction worker, produced in the very material of the building itself. The artist renders this quotidian object heavy and useless, dangling on the wall as a sculpture rather than as a practical component of a blue-collar uniform. Further, by displaying the helmet in varying shades of grey concrete, Braula Reis dwells on the materiality of the article, underscoring the object as an aesthetic material, where factors like color and curvature make these works a site not for use but for looking. And yet Braula Reis’ infatuation with the helmet extends beyond the aesthetic; while the construction helmet is used by workers to erect buildings, it is likewise used to raze them. It is the duality of the helmet, its use in both construction and destruction, that is most compelling to the artist. Braula Reis’ image transference works consider parallel subjects, juxtaposing construction sites with explosions in quarries.

The artist also inserts her own working environment into this show. Concrete reappears in If Only I Could Stay (Protective Boots) where she places her own work boots in concrete blocks. Here she ruminates on notions of heft, weightiness, immobility, and concrete’s diverse connotations. In another piece, If Only I Could Stay (Work Trousers), a pair of her own work pants hang nearby and add to this personal flourish. By portraying this paraphernalia, Braula Reis reflects on her own working process. She analyzes these ideas on a macro level in the sculptural triptych To Define a Place, to Hold it Still, where she renders casts of floor, brick, and roof tiles in white plaster.

Braula Reis’ video work 00:04:54 (created in collaboration with James Lake) depicts a choreographed exchange of sand between the cupped palms of two people. The sand slips through the cracks and crevices of their fingers as they transfer the material back and forth, repeating the process until the granules are depleted. The artist provides two angles on this process—the transfer act between the two figures and a top-down perspective of the steady stream of material as it slowly, almost imperceptibly, falls into a small pile by their feet. As these tiny pieces gather on the ground, one might regard the falling sand as a mode of destruction. At the same time, the sand that falls forms little mounds. These mounds are structures. Mountains, one may recall, are destined to become boulders, rocks, and, finally, sand itself. Ashes to ashes and dust to dust, for Braula Reis, construction and destruction can so easily be conflated.

Text by Simone Krug.
Photos by Joshua White.

Teresa Braula Reis - White Helmet
Baert Gallery, October 7 - November 18
www.baertgallery.com

Isaac Lythgoe - Janus, EXO EXO

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These days in middling drift. Science awash with irrepressible fantasy. I was both the first and third person. Futures crossing between platforms, swarming junctions, technologies are natural forces.

The fountain of youth is a concept for later, we’ll get to that. For now the hope exists, chrysalis in the innocence of 21, sweet clippings of arms swung at parties, to swimming pools drunk and bed past dawn. Lives lived and years frittered. Disappearance our forever headline. Steps slippery, all those ringing announcements for the older ages. Bodies crash and rot - there and gone. To silicates, to sands, to dusts. Past lives. The dessert left is the ageless swirling of new beginnings, fractions to stack, old lives to relive, new bodies to run with.

It was years ago when the draw of youth and the fading of mine found an intersection. For a while I had a yearly meeting with a beautiful and precocious 22yr old. From Vienna or Rome, I never wanted to be certain. Our setting was consistent; old, history rich, European city, summer, dusk. Once a year, inevitably. I imagine her hijacking a plane at 40,000ft, wrenching out the escape hatch, greedy hands feeding my case’s contents into the follies of a bruising, Atlantic storm, and when all seems lost, passports and bikinis swirling across headrests she leans in close, grinning, and passes me a parachute. Soft as rain in the storm’s eye, bumping thermals down. All to float in that perfect pond a little while.

Late May, Athens, rain off and on, 27C and the university students are getting into the spirit of the season, gassed tears of summer break joy, wet faces and leather jackets alike.

All we ever see of the stars are old photos. Dimmed lights. Bottles blow off the platform and settle in the coal-like gravel. There in purgatory, destined to fade and forget. Gaps to bridge and blanks to fill in. Space is never empty. Burn bright, forget and smoulder.

Stealing beauty, I can’t, I can, I don’t. The old man crested up to our party on the perch. His shuffle I thought I knew. There was something in the arch of the back, the crooked little fingers, I knew him I knew. But the grey morning and last night’s buzz muddied everything. It was more one of those moments in the city, a long glimpse down to an intersection and we think we know someone. There’s the uncanny feeling of familiarity. I’ve always thought I recognised people, I knew a long time ago that my mind remembered the details. Make up is a distortion. Clothes are owned by the body. We have little and much to hide, but somehow its always there, seeping through the seams, flesh puppeteering cloth, identity is always more or less.

The bar had wound down before daybreak, somewhere along those summer streets we’d hatched a plan. Our moment for sunrise and the Acropolis, a theatre and then some, the stadia of greater humans. The path had been steep a while, the girl drifting out of sight between houses, up snaking stairwells and so it came that we rested beneath a fence in the pit of Parthenon. It was here that he found us, slowly into sight a 50, 60 something man. Grey, dishevelled, running shoes from last year looking decades old. The type you recognise instantly but can’t place at all. The lunatic on the street corner, too much life throbbed through those eyeballs. It was a routine not unlike that of a bird’s; slow shuffling peck at the trash, the carrier bag had been dragged and crinkled through it a thousand times before, the once day glow orange, turned fleshy, veined, pink. He wound through our natter, collecting the cigarette stubs and on back down from where we’d come. Time passed, the sun rose, mottled clouds. Those first rays have taken 8minutes and 20seconds to reach us, they’ll hit Mars 10minutes old.

When he summited again I felt some bereft pang, that stomach turn at the end of the night, the clear shiver of a day unwanted. As he trod the steps I’d walk half an hour before, concept of tense forgotten. He was at my side and moving me a little, and hand cupped he brushed the ashes of a little fire from the edge of my seat. We pause there on cold. Some time goes by. He muttered, and the voice, I could swear was the very tone I hear when I write this now. And in the shadow of ruins, arm by arm, two steps below me, and two steps above, we sat, fumbled a pocket, procured a cigarette and looked out over the islands.

Isaac Lythgoe - Janus
EXO EXO, September 14 - October 22
www.exoexo.xyz

MATH BASS - DOMINO KINGDOM, TANYA LEIGHTON

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This time, it was a speech bubble. With each new set of her "NEWZ!" paintings, I like to study the one or few new forms that emerge        have always been there.      She found a speech bubble        revealed its absence       by carving the shape of doorway from that of a bone.

Math Bass has built       unraveled       the "NEWZ!" series by making a grammar out of negative space. Often, forms emerge not through their presence but rather through what's withdrawn from view. I try to follow        backtrack        from A to B to Z. Math told me the quotation mark she uses came from       is just        the nostril of her often-featured alligator. (You won't find the quote in this show, but you'll get the gator's jaws). From nostril to quotation mark, a shape becomes another by not changing at all. Here,a cavity becomes language        words congeal around a void.

The operation       making sense out of absence       makes me think about all the visceral abstractions I wade through:        like gender, like value. How they work by circulation and repetition,       like a kingdom of dominoes.       How they concretize bodies       like concrete poured in jeans      by evacuating meaning       like limp canvas sleeves.       What is gender, what is value, besides an appearance of coherence       after the fact of fabrication?      And        from Rob Halpern      what is a body besides "a hole around which everything that appears, appears to cohere"?

I think about all the visceralabstractions wrapped around me: like value, like gender         granddiscourses of cash and cum.         How being abstract doesn't make them any less real            ly able to immiserate and kill.         How they take their place among our many integuments-      not just the rind, but the pith, not just the pith, but the membrane around each bit of pulp.       How we grow into their architectures       stretched canvas gym mat,       or their folds      the way unsewn hems appear to have been flayed,       or need them to prop ourselves up on         this is the staircase's teeth.       Meanwhile, the metaphors of condensation and coagulation are all I       Sianne Ngai      have left to describe their work       shrines to an aftermath presented as the present.

Playing dumb        Los Angeles artist         I watch        turn my head       as one object becomes another by not changing at all          from N to W to Z (!).       The grammar of negative space manages to articulate difference out of more of the same.       How can language stand in for what's unsaid?         Maybe negative space is another way of referring to tone: the work the body does around the words. Maybe negative space is the body itself       a hole, a void, a wound        defined by its vulnerability        to penetration, definition.        Maybe these speech bubbles aren't speech bubbles after all, but rather a kind of catachresis         for the loss that speechlessness itself can't articulate, or the hollow in the marrow.       In dominoes, a single tile is called a bone.

Text by Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal.

Math Bass - Domino Kingdom
Tanya Leighton, September 9 - October 21
www.tanyaleighton.com

John Wallbank - ARCADE

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Strategies of mapping, whether they be environmental, physical or architectural, define the artistic profile of John Wallbank, who simultaneously intersects the lines between drawing and sculpture through an ecology of material becoming. The graphic trait, elaborated through the digital, as seen in the artist’s book Drawing, 2013, is analogous to the function of his sculptures, exploring the distance between the raw material given by nature and the artist’s approach to the surroundings. By confronting the chaos of heterogeneous accumulations, the mimetic approach of John Wallbank consists of processing material until reaching the very essence of its elements (glass fibre, resin, cotton fabric), similar to a carving depth. Sculpture is conceived of as a process of sublation between voids and masses, the positive and the negative of material morphologies. By excavating these polarities, the artist prototypes sculptural models via spatial extensions, sequences and scales. 

Interested in the adherence to natural and human forms, John Wallbank draws upon the register of classical sculpture to propose a new artistic inventory where geometry is replaced by mapping, form by processes of in-formation and composition by strategies of spatial extensions. It follows that the physicality of his work is marked by the elasticity of material intensities in between sculptural components, which investigate the mutability of shapes between concavities and convexities, lines and folds. When confronting the landscape, the artist’s strategy is contemporaneously an act of direct observation and a practice of rendering, moving across the lines and crosses of bodily extensions, mediated by the mastery of tools. As in climbing, the accumulative process of physical measurement finds a stylistic reference in the work of Kurt Schwitters who, by defining his artistic process, whether sculptural or graphic, famously stated: “Stone upon stone is building” (Schwitters, 1993). By mastering an imperfect equilibrium between concrete and abstract, chaos and synthesis, sedimentations and altitudes, in Wallbank’s hands sculpture reflects a trans-formative process of mapping and moulding. 

Three contemporaneous projects developed with Arcade cover and articulate a spectrum for Wallbank’s strategies. In Untitled (Sewn Cube), presented at Frieze Sculpture, Regents Park, London 2017, the artist redefines the balancing act between solids and voids by assembling a volume from interwoven flat surfaces, which open to the public sphere, exploring the external relations of the sculptural envelope. At Arcade, the artist shifts attention to the inherent qualities of sculptural models by unveiling the dynamics in between sculptural forces and compositions, with a focus on the linkages that weave the structure. From the chaotic nature of raw materials, the artist configures the expressive axis of a large-scale sculptural model by exploring the inner and outer aspects of spatial extensions.  Similarly, the project anticipated for DAMA, Turin, 2017, intends to respond to the existing Baroque architecture by colonizing the space via contrasts and relations among physical objects, as if in a dramatic tension. Moving away from the legacies of space and tradition, John Wallbank’s work becomes a vessel for experimental practices and new modes of positioning sculpture. 

Text by Sara Buoso.

John Wallbank
ARCADE, September 13 - October 21
www.arcadefinearts.com

Pentti Monkkonen - V.S.O.P, High Art

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Pentti Monkkonen, Calvados Dauphin VSOP, 2017

Pentti Monkkonen, Calvados Dauphin VSOP, 2017

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

Installation view, Pentti Monkkonen, V.S.O.P, High Art.

The old man in building A
Drinks Fernet once a day
And his mate in unit 8
Sips chartreuse to get loose
The old lady in building B
Smokes Gauloises on the balcony
And the guy in unit 5
drinks Cointreau to feel alive
The couple seen in building G
Pours Dauphin in golden streams
The raconteur in unit 4
Spilled Pernod on the floor
And the dude in unit 2
Smokes Vogues in the nude.

Pentti Monkkonen - V.S.O.P
High Art, September 9 – October 12
www.highart.fr

ED FORNIELES - SEED, CARLOS/ISHIKAWA

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At its best the gallery is an imaginarium, a place in which ideas can be fostered, modelled and tested. In this current juncture it feels art can cross its parameter line with more ease than before; accidentally or with intent finding itself in radically different contexts, being used in radically new ways. It’s this capacity to cross lines, to bleed that is most interesting to me at the moment, it’s a point in which a work risks collapse, losing a certain vital plane of ambiguity in exchange for becoming real in someone else’s hands.
But perhaps another plane might be opening up at this point, a different register of ambiguity that seeds itself firmly in affect, however small that might be. Untethered from the object work becomes active, its contours, complexity and core registered in the trickle of thoughts and actions activated in the viewer, their groups and the structures they inhabit.
An idea is seeded, then taken up, then stripped back and repurposed for its new environment; but yet something still remains. This new form, a truly collaborative one flows back into the gallery with ease, a form that sits somewhere between the authentic and found and resonates with its interactions.
The gallery at this point has changed function, operating as a memetic platform, a place of exchange in which art is defined as proposition, that once realized can be deployed, held, felt, taken on or rejected.

Ed Fornieles - Seed
Carlos/Ishikawa, September 22 - October 28
www.carlosishikawa.com

RENATO LEOTTA - AMICIZIA, GALERIA MADRAGOA

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The exhibition is the picture of a mental garden in which enthusiasm and admiration are the engine that moves the relationship between nature and man, according to very ancient rules. Friendship, as a cosmic force necessary to life, positive or negative, drives in harmony all the elements in this place.

The garden is enclosed by a wall, that circumscribes a space formed by images in which possible projections of friendship reside. Each stone of the wall has to match the one on its side, the one that is above and the one below, for the structure to be solid and lasting. In a mnemonic rite, the hand composes this puzzle, which is both an organic and solid structure. A shelter, a border, a religious object, a sculpture.

All together, as a wall, the stones tell us about solidarity, sharing and trust that create communities. They are the first attempt of landscape anthropization, the first architectural gesture.

The ancients paid divine honors to the stones even before trasforming them into statues or sculptures; these, polished by the passage of time that acted on them as a divine hand, are the image of the Good.

Songs, tales and myths are shared, but there are also confidential elements, exclusive ties. The secret – it is also a founding element of friendship. At night, this secret becomes more visible, because it is possible to sense its contours.

The fireflies move in bright dances within the limits of the garden that seem to belong to this shadow place. The traits, signs and trajectories that their light produces are an alphabet, a collection of coded messages, and logic games to decipher. Information that is concealed to the eyes of most people.

The evil part of nature is united to what is incomprehensible and inexplicable to us within this psychological garden. We attribute them a mysterious and divine origin, while questioning man’s darkness.

Above the garden, the air and the sun create a narrative made of temporality, describing the waiting time for the prodigy.

The camera works by being adjusted by the wind. Following an abstract parameter that does not change the contours of the landscape, but charges it with temporality. Recording occurs when the wind blows from the west. The sea with its undertows keeps drawing silver marks on the sand.

The space of the garden is diluted with the space of the adventure, tracing a continuity between the two exhibitions and a hypothetical connection between the two extremes of the political Europe: the most eastern island of the Dodecanese and Lisbon, passing through Sicily.


From a conversation between Renato Leotta and Davide Daninos. 

Lisboa, September 2017.

Renato Leotta - Amicizia
Galeria Madragoa, September 14 - November 4
www.galeriamadragoa.pt

Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa - Shit-baby and the Crumpled Giraffe, Kunsthalle Lissabon

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In his work Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa seeks to confront historical narratives with personal memories. His relationship with the past, especially that of Latin America, is a tangle of History to which Ramirez-Figueroa accesses through his own biography. In his projects, which take the form of performances and installations, he uses the languages of folklore, science fiction and theater to reshape these events and their protagonists through his personal experiences.

For Kunsthalle Lissabon Naufus Ramirez-Figueiroa has developed a new installation that builds on his interest in childhood and the way the body functions or is trained to function, namely how we are trained as children to use the potty. His interest in this phase of life and what is projected in the infant universe is already evident in previous works, such as Illusion of Matter, recently presented in Tate Modern, Props for Erendira, presented at the 10th Biennial of Gwanju, or No se como decir no se, presented in Sultana Gallery.

Upon entering the exhibition, the visitor sees small and varied objects on the floor, which, after a careful inspection, are identified as potties and feces laboriously sculpted in styrofoam and painted with mineral pigments and epoxy paints. The resemblance to glazed ceramic objects is disconcerting. After this first encounter, the gaze turns to the end of the room where a larger sculpture dominates the field of vision. Approaching this sculpture reveals it as a child looking directly at a stork carrying a bundle of feces.

The whole floor of the exhibition space is covered by these sculptures depicting feces and potties, similar to jewels, and as the visitor progresses through the installation, she sees another sculpture, whose shape looks like a giraffe. This is the giraffe referred to in the title of the exhibition. The space is still crossed by a sculpture that resembles, in form, a serpent and that hovers over the whole installation. It is fecal matter born in the air, a levitated spirit expelled from the bowels of an unknown interior.

This installation, produced specifically for Kunsthalle Lissabon, is a product of the fantastic world in which Ramírez-Figueroa moves. The artist often works as a director who creates traumatic echoes, creating stunning images that evoke feelings that are both distinct and irreconcilable, that speak to us of both a violent past and a turbulent present, always with a certain amount of humor.

Photos by Bruno Lopes.

Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa - Shit-baby and the Crumpled Giraffe
Kunsthalle Lissabon, Septemer 20 - February 12
www.kunsthalle-lissabon.org

Emily Mae Smith - The Sphinx or The Caress, Simone Subal Gallery

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Emily Mae Smith is versed in various strategies of representation. She pulls from disparate sources to create paintings that reflect the complexity of our time and personhood. She has been particularly interested in a wide range of neo-classical and symbolist works—commonly known as the twisted end of academic painting—in part because these compositions delve deeply into the abyss of the subconscious.

Paintings such as The Other End playfully manipulate a bookplate from the fin-de-siècle journal The Studio into a gendered portal addressing the frame of painting itself. Another work Sentinel Madonnas (Monument Valley) brings together imagery drawn from M.C. Escher, a popular video game, and medieval icon painting. A larger painting, The Riddle, riffs on Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres’ famousworkOedipusandtheSphinxfrom1808. SmithmaintainsmanyofIngres’distinctive elements. She has, however, made a crucial alteration: Oedipus has been replaced by Smith’s recurring “broom lady” character, a clear reference to the bewitched broom in the film Fantasia and also a vehicle for Smith to explore the anxiety surrounding the creative act as well as the formation of subjectivity.

A central aspect of Smith’s imagery is a re-working of art history’s exclusion of the inner lives of women. This critique is bound up in her own assessment of the present day—a moment in which misogyny is rampant yet deeply buried in our shared myths—and the ways in which works of art have traditionally represented women as either a muse or as a femme fatale. She is particularly interested in how identity is inscribed on a body, and her surreal, anthropomorphic figures become sites to construct complex narratives and internal dialogues. Nowhere is this more apparent than in her Portrait as a Klein Bottle, which transforms the Mobius strip-like vessel—it has no discernable inside or outsides and thus cannot contain anything—into a metaphor for the self and the constant mutability of subjectivity.

A subtle, dry humor lurks on the surface of the works on view. However, Smith does not look for cheap laughs. Instead, she uses humor to reveal a sense of pain and truth, a means to express inequities and disparities. Smith’s most recent paintings are powerful, complex worlds that compress historical time, raise questions about authorship, and display trenchant social critique through the cipher of remarkably rendered compositions. 

Emily Mae Smith - The Sphinx or The Caress
Simone Subal Gallery, September 10 - October 29
www.simonesubal.com

Contribution by Timothy Hull.

AUJOURD'HUI X ARTISSIMA 2017

Artissima, International Fair of Contemporary Art, Torino, 2016 © Perottino-Alfero-Tardito/ Artissima 2016

Artissima, International Fair of Contemporary Art, Torino, 2016
© Perottino-Alfero-Tardito/ Artissima 2016

Aujourd'hui is proud to announce its partnership with Artissima, Italy’s leading contemporary art fair, will return to the Olympic Oval pavilion in Turin from November 3 to 5, 2017, for the first time under the guidance of Ilaria Bonacossa. 

Renowned on an international level for its focus on experimental practices and its path of constant innovation from one year to the next, in 2017 the fair will feature a series of new developments: besides the recently announced new Disegni (Drawings) section, the updated team of curators and an innovative digital platform, Artissima will be enhanced by new ideas and specific initiatives: a special exhibition project, the “Deposito d’Arte Italiana Presente” (Warehouse of Present-Day Italian Art), an innovative programme of talks, and a renewed architectural layout for the fair pavilion designed by studio Vudafieri Saverino Partners of Milan.

“The year 2017—Ilaria Bonacossa explains—is the 50th anniversary of the initiatives that were essential to the genesis of Arte Povera. Artissima attempts to trace back through some of the most novel experiences of that period, which laid the groundwork for Turin’s status as the Italian capital of contemporary art. The fair will investigate the relationships between artistic practices, the market, collecting and leisure time through the temporary reconstruction of iconic contexts like the Deposito d’Arte Presente (1967–68) or the Piper (1966–69) club, for their visionary capacity to reinvent roles and to activate contaminations between different disciplines.”

We will have more updates and exclusive content leading up to the fair and also live during the exhibiting days. 

Artissima 2017
3 – 5 November 2017
Vernissage (upon invitation): 2 November 2017
Opening Hours: 12 – 8pm

For more information please visit www.artissima.it 

Anu Vahtra and Martin Lukáč - Interpreter’s Booth, Lucie Drdova Gallery

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Ignotum per ignotius
Unknown by more unknown 

Not to create any doubtful theories around the following exhibition I wish to state that interpreter's booth I’m referring to in the title is a banal square construction build with a clear purpose to host translators during conferences or any other events that demands simultaneous translation.

Art demands a simultaneous translation or as Ranciere refers to it in Emancipated Spectator, art is a simultaneous translation where relationship between content producer (actor) and content receiver (viewer) is fluent and free from any form of stratification. Openness of art lies in the fact that (despite music) this visual discipline is the most abstract one. Indeed what we are dealing with the most is a message without words, a shape rather than a story and a sensation rather than a plot. Interpretation is a tool to understand art. By all means. 

Let’s imagine a situation in the muted booth where both of the interpreters instead of work decided to talk to each other. Their microphones are turned off and we cannot hear them at all. Observing their gesture and mimics I become more aware that what I’m looking at know it’s more of a performance than a dialogue. It has no informative side. Question remains what language do they use to communicate. Most likely both of them. 

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If you wish to get a tip how to read following exhibition I’d suggest to concentrate on the surroundings rather than pieces per se

In Anu’s artistic practice we follow banal objects from the environment around us being transferred visually and contextually into abstract images or artifacts. What was before an unnoticed fragment of the interior a tight corner or a plane shape of a white square is animated by artist’s gesture and becomes an art piece. As simple as that. 

Surroundings is being reproduced and turned into an abstract piece. 

Key words: animation, concept, cleanness.

Similar tactics is present in Martin’s paintings. By default abstract canvas are never just beinghanged inside of the white and sterile cube. Furthermore they contaminate the space around them so the expression from the paintings goes beyond and fill in the gallery with all kind of objects whether they are shoes, nets, wooden panels or banner prints.  

An abstract art piece affect the surroundings and turn in into environmental installation. 

Key words: gesture, expression, contamination.  

To be continued...

Curated by Piotr Sikora.

Anu Vahtra and Martin Lukáč - Interpreter's Booth
Lucie Drdova Gallery, September 9 - October 21