AUJOURD'HUI X ARTISSIMA 2017

Artissima, International Fair of Contemporary Art, Torino, 2016 © Perottino-Alfero-Tardito/ Artissima 2016

Artissima, International Fair of Contemporary Art, Torino, 2016
© Perottino-Alfero-Tardito/ Artissima 2016

Aujourd'hui is proud to announce its partnership with Artissima, Italy’s leading contemporary art fair, will return to the Olympic Oval pavilion in Turin from November 3 to 5, 2017, for the first time under the guidance of Ilaria Bonacossa. 

Renowned on an international level for its focus on experimental practices and its path of constant innovation from one year to the next, in 2017 the fair will feature a series of new developments: besides the recently announced new Disegni (Drawings) section, the updated team of curators and an innovative digital platform, Artissima will be enhanced by new ideas and specific initiatives: a special exhibition project, the “Deposito d’Arte Italiana Presente” (Warehouse of Present-Day Italian Art), an innovative programme of talks, and a renewed architectural layout for the fair pavilion designed by studio Vudafieri Saverino Partners of Milan.

“The year 2017—Ilaria Bonacossa explains—is the 50th anniversary of the initiatives that were essential to the genesis of Arte Povera. Artissima attempts to trace back through some of the most novel experiences of that period, which laid the groundwork for Turin’s status as the Italian capital of contemporary art. The fair will investigate the relationships between artistic practices, the market, collecting and leisure time through the temporary reconstruction of iconic contexts like the Deposito d’Arte Presente (1967–68) or the Piper (1966–69) club, for their visionary capacity to reinvent roles and to activate contaminations between different disciplines.”

We will have more updates and exclusive content leading up to the fair and also live during the exhibiting days. 

Artissima 2017
3 – 5 November 2017
Vernissage (upon invitation): 2 November 2017
Opening Hours: 12 – 8pm

For more information please visit www.artissima.it 

Anu Vahtra and Martin Lukáč - Interpreter’s Booth, Lucie Drdova Gallery

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Ignotum per ignotius
Unknown by more unknown 

Not to create any doubtful theories around the following exhibition I wish to state that interpreter's booth I’m referring to in the title is a banal square construction build with a clear purpose to host translators during conferences or any other events that demands simultaneous translation.

Art demands a simultaneous translation or as Ranciere refers to it in Emancipated Spectator, art is a simultaneous translation where relationship between content producer (actor) and content receiver (viewer) is fluent and free from any form of stratification. Openness of art lies in the fact that (despite music) this visual discipline is the most abstract one. Indeed what we are dealing with the most is a message without words, a shape rather than a story and a sensation rather than a plot. Interpretation is a tool to understand art. By all means. 

Let’s imagine a situation in the muted booth where both of the interpreters instead of work decided to talk to each other. Their microphones are turned off and we cannot hear them at all. Observing their gesture and mimics I become more aware that what I’m looking at know it’s more of a performance than a dialogue. It has no informative side. Question remains what language do they use to communicate. Most likely both of them. 

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If you wish to get a tip how to read following exhibition I’d suggest to concentrate on the surroundings rather than pieces per se

In Anu’s artistic practice we follow banal objects from the environment around us being transferred visually and contextually into abstract images or artifacts. What was before an unnoticed fragment of the interior a tight corner or a plane shape of a white square is animated by artist’s gesture and becomes an art piece. As simple as that. 

Surroundings is being reproduced and turned into an abstract piece. 

Key words: animation, concept, cleanness.

Similar tactics is present in Martin’s paintings. By default abstract canvas are never just beinghanged inside of the white and sterile cube. Furthermore they contaminate the space around them so the expression from the paintings goes beyond and fill in the gallery with all kind of objects whether they are shoes, nets, wooden panels or banner prints.  

An abstract art piece affect the surroundings and turn in into environmental installation. 

Key words: gesture, expression, contamination.  

To be continued...

Curated by Piotr Sikora.

Anu Vahtra and Martin Lukáč - Interpreter's Booth
Lucie Drdova Gallery, September 9 - October 21

GIANNI FERRERO MERLINO - GIORGIO GALOTTI

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The entire project arises from the will to use architectural laws as a medium to be in touch with the memory, starting from Aldo Rossi's thinking who observed the private person's condition as the only one useful to create buildings. The series presented in the exhibition is therefore based on a dialogue with the Rossi’s monument to Sandro Pertini (Milan 1988-1990). The work is considered both a theater and a meeting place, consisting of a large staircase ending with a square very similar to a theater stage. The fact that this stage is behind the "public" sitting, makes it a space where thoughts are conveyed, a mystical and almost unreal place where, what has been thought and what has been remembered, they recite together. The architectural work consists of the reiteration of a form, a code, an element that emphasizes the theatrical component. Through these features, Rossi's architectural ideas are clearly manifested, making this construction the starting point for recomposing memory through exercise and repetition. 

In the "Project of Villa with Interior" the medium used is the photosensitive material as a recording element, the object of investigation is the memory, here understood as a fragment of a construction. Photographic work therefore becomes only a way to bring back the structural tension of this monument, a reinterpretation stimulating inner constructive action and leading to the discovery of a new condition, invisible to the eyes. As if, by studying and repeating a gesture, the memory could be fixed so permanently that it could be seen in front of itself. The whole set of works are considered to be designed through the lens of the camera, the touch taken by adding or subtracting further geometric shapes into the darkroom, a process that allows the memory to reach the interior to overlap it with reality.

Gianni Ferrero Merlino
Giorgio Galotti, September 7 - October 6
www.giorgiogalotti.com

CORNELIA BALTES - CAPRI, GALLERI NICOLAI WALLNER

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Evoking feelings of summer, sun and nostalgia, Baltes invites us into a world where everything feels intensified. Summer is a season that plays by its own set of rules—it is exotic, it is energising and it is something we think and fantasise about year-round. Summer has the potential to answer all of our problems or, at the very least, to provide us with a kind of temporary escape. This possible escape, however, gives way to a kind of urgency. Summer comes with an end date, thus each of its days is contextualised by a need to maximise them to the fullest. In this sense it becomes a state of mind, balancing a desire to do everything with a need to do everything.

In CAPRI, each of Baltes’ paintings play on these emotions. Moving beyond the canvas, the works are immersive and captivating, creating an infectious feeling.

This light-handed and animated energy that Baltes’ works produce is made possible by her impressive technique and understanding of mark-making. Each brushstroke is meticulously planned, made with the intention of evoking these sensations in the viewer. The richly pigmented black paint Baltes uses creates an enveloping depth in counterpoint to a background created by concentrated and almost unreal colours, the two blending seamlessly one into the other. The fizz and pop caught between the formal tension of their elements and the almost impressionistic rendering of a scene.

Adding to the playfulness of the works are their titles—each painting has a name like Mario, Holden, Cody or Cooper—creating a kind of mystery and narrative around who or what they might be: enhancing the figurative reading against the formal.

Baltes shows us fleeting glimpses of bare skin and a sun burn, a pair of flip flops, legs, pool toys, water splashing and more abstract elements that come together to tease us, to show us what we are missing, and to ask us to join in.

Cornelia Baltes - Capri
Galleri Nicolai Wallner, August 25 - October 14
www.nicolaiwallner.com

MELIKE KARA - Köpek, PERES PROJECTS

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You can argue how migration stimulates the economy, or try to explain how structural racism happens anywhere. You can debate the validity of the nation state, and claim that identity is constructed like a flag on the moon. You might call for radical change, but that doesn’t change how people feel about these topics. How they feel depends on who they are, where they are, and how they’re able to relate their particular past. Our memories leave marks, and as the body remembers things it establishes habits. Even though everyone’s body and past are unique, many share a comparable experience.

Aware of these complexities, Melike Kara’s work addresses the basic ideas of what it means to belong, and how people behave when they have to deal with each other. In her second exhibition at Peres Projects, Kara uses painting, sculpture and photography to explore questions of identity through those of anonymity. As before, Kara’s paintings depict figures which do not seem to belong anywhere but on the canvas they inhabit. Virtually bare, the works represent scenes of human interaction without any reference to gender, age or culture. They might be gods, or end up being monsters. The artistic choice to refuse any such allusions enhances the symbolic quality of the figures that have become emblematic for the artist. This refusal is used to create a pattern of potentiality, defying mere ambiguity. The point that the figures could be anyone isn’t necessarily interesting, rather it is their potential best or worst, the polar divide, which determines them. Like this, the usage of anonymity which characterizes the figures’ identity becomes ornamental, like jewelry, worn to seduce and daunt.

The figures are overtly acting out their function, displaying a wide array of conduct and social mechanisms. Behavior that happens anywhere, anytime. The artist looks at how people touch each other, how they love and fight. She throws them together and isolates them in the brutality of their own presence. As they are made to interact, individuals naturally oppose each other, this seems to exist universally. With analytical precision, Melike Kara tests the psychological breadth of her images, by juxtaposing her figures’ instability with the power which they conjure as a group. There is a fundamental humility to these paintings, as their core idea is rooted in the living body, embracing the chages of life as we live it.

In this exhibition, Melike Kara approaches anonymity in different ways. On another layer, she installed photographic wallpapers which depict places in Germany and Turkey. The images are devoid of people, yet suggest at a human presence through architecture, collected flowers, and a gravestone. Whereas the paintings refuse to make reference to a place or time, the photography decidedly refers to the contemporary state of these worlds, which the artist calls her home. The pictures taken in Turkey are extremely personal, raising question of the self in light of one’s own family history. How much of the self is a composition of our background? Where does my family’s imprint end and where does my identity begin? The German photography, on the other hand, is not related to the artist’s biography. Here, she documented closed market stores owned by second or third generation Turkish immigrants, bringing up the topic of cultural integration and its economic value, how one can be immersed in another culture but never really belong, and how our visibility renders us invisible, denying us access.

The main problem of the concept of diaspora, is the general misconception that people belong to a certain territory when historically, people have always moved around. To claim territory is problematic in many ways and it can lead to jealousy and the fear of loss. However, claiming territory for the weak or marginalized can be an honorable thing to do. But what if those who are marginalized use the same strategies of exclusivity and marginalization of others? What if love always hurts?

Text by Tenzing Barshee.

Melike Kara - Köpek
Peres Projects, September 7 - November 3
www.peresprojects.com

David Ostrowski - Bei mir geht es in den Keller hoch, Blueproject Foundation

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The Blueproject Foundation presents "Bei mir geht es in den Keller hoch", the first personal exhibition of the artist David Ostrowski in Spain that can be seen in the Sala Project from July 14th to October 1st, 2017. The exhibition allows the visitors to discover the pictorial work of the artist, presenting a selection of paintings, as well as a large installation that will occupy the center of the Sala Project.

Cologne-based artist, David Ostrowski (b. 1981) has created an “oeuvre of paintings that comes almost eerily close to the idea of this kind of zero point, while simultaneously reminding us of the impossibility of ever truly getting there”, as Daniel Schreiber explains in a reference to Roland Barthes’ famous zero degree. “According to Barthes, every artwork always also conveys the illusions of the culture in which it was created and whose language it employs. The mesh of everyday myths is ineluctable, the thicket of codes impenetrable. And yet the desire for a zero point is vital. Without this desire, art would be inconceivable”, explains Schreiber.

“Ostrowski’s works arise from a forced elimination of painting knowledge and an expressed ambition to understand this idea of the void as a confrontation with the history of painting. With his confident and complex circumlocutions around the non-motif, Ostrowski succeeds in opening the space of the canvas to singular irruptions of perception, to an unexpected liberation of seeing” (Daniel Schreiber). 

David Ostrowski - Bei mir geht es in den Keller hoch
Blueproject Foundation - July 14 - October 1
www.blueprojectfoundation.com

Nicolas Lamas - Ocaso, Galeria Lucia de la Puente

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Ocaso is the last individual show of Nicolas Lama, Peruvian artist who lives in Belgium. For this new project, Lamas uses a series of meetings and unstable relationships between elements from different contexts, which interact within a space of a gallery under a not established parameters. Ocaso proposes an ontological review to our present under a dark and quiet perspective, where light seems to be diluted behind a horizon which is about to disappear.

Nicolas Lamas - Ocaso
Galeria Lucia de la Puente, August 10 - September 6
www.gluciadelapuente.com

Wolfgang Voegele - Sluggo, FIFI Projects

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For Wolfgang Voegele, the figuration dissolves in the composition; for him it is about getting to a state in the paintings, where he can paint without thinking.
Voegele works with form in an area between abstraction and figuration, using similar forms in an unpredictable pattern. The artist compares his practice to the automatism of Robert Motherwell, an American painter who formed part of the New York School of abstract expressionism. He elaborates: "There is always a sense of figuration in the paintings, and it is never completely abstract. The forms are always, in some way, figurative by themselves. But together with the other forms in the picture, they dissolve in the composition."

The question remains whether the painting loses its relevance or is going to be replaced by modern media. Voegele states: "Some years ago there was this big talk about painting, and if it was necessary anymore. A very unnecessary question, because painting was always there and it will always be something that we use to express ourselves with. It’s like music, why should it disappear? I often hear the question of what painting can be today, and the funny thing is that there was never an answer, only the question."

Wolfgang Voegele - Sluggo
FIFI Projects, August 21 - October 11
www.fifiprojects.net

SELECTED WORKS FROM THE BECH RISVIG COLLECTION - HUSET FOR KUNST OG DESIGN

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Dear Claus,

Stay alive

Sitting in a bush holding a dog’s paw
The spider web that swept in during the mystery of night
Leveling mountainsides
A blackberry seed caught between teeth

Solemn shivering rainstorm, clinched hands, fog rising, smoking under umbrella A way to stare piercingly into each other

Humans breathing under cantilevers, through pouring water, hope reflecting from everything, alone, together, looking

Screaming hard from the deepest part of your guts psychotic irrational primal breakneck tarpaper spear dirtbath forevernap

Jaguar red indelible furious sunrise
One thousand mile diffuse effusive spiritual pine mountaintop Infinite sapience eclipsing, collapsing

Spit crimson into the shower
Church organing Kawasaki serrate air chattering off the landscape

Worms curl in
Scuffed boat hull Disparate granularity Wavering teenage voices Polynomial objectivity Manic bliss
Mahler
Sludge
Fingerprints
Rocks

I heard once that life is a dream inside the mind of God.
Art is us telling ourselves that we are alive, inside this dream, inside this mad mind.
I dont give a fuck where we are- here in some philosophical solipsist I can hear birds at 5am take pharmaceutical h-dab in airports nod out typing and drink coffee wind is in trees behind my head Im alive

Nothing about us is about stasis it is all about the language of life bursting in every direction from every fucking thing

Love,
Andrew Birk


Exhibiting artists: Ricardo Passaporte, Pedro Matos, Martin Lukac, Jenny Brosinski, Giuseppe De Mattia, Francesca Longhini, Grant Wells, Joshua Evan, Asger Dybvad Larsen, Søren Sejr, Gijs van Lith, Jonas Lund, Peter Mohall, Tove Storch, Andrew Birk, Steven Cox, David Stjernholm, Jon Pilkington, Matthew David Smith, Ted Gahl, James Krone, E.B. Itso, Wolfgang Voegele, Lea Guldditte Hestelund, Ethan Cook, Sophia Pompéry, Angelo Volpe, Magnus Thierfelder, Lorenzo De Angelis, David Rosado, Andreas Albrectsen, Rieko Hotta, Lazar Lyutakov, Jan S. Hansen, Adam Jeppesen, Morten Barker, Ismar Cirkinagic, Anders Bülow, Habib Farajabadi, Ryan Nord Kitchen, Francois Patoue, Cody Tumblin, John Knuth, Manuel Forte, Morten Knudsen, Charles Munka, Alexander Tillegreen, Antonio Della Corte & Alessandro Moroder

Selected Works from the Bech Risvig Collection
Huset for Kunst og Design, August 20 - October 1
www.hfkd.dk

Pakui Hardware - Creatures of Habit, SIC

Installation view, Pakui Hardware, Creatures of Habit, SIC

Installation view, Pakui Hardware, Creatures of Habit, SIC

Installation view, Pakui Hardware, Creatures of Habit, SIC

Installation view, Pakui Hardware, Creatures of Habit, SIC

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Immersed in leisure while automated bodies scurry around carrying out our daily routines and work, we devote ourselves to spiritual and cultural augmentation, cultivation of our creativity and fitness. Everyone is familiar with such kind of phantasy of automation. It is, of course, accessible to only part of the future post-working class.

While as today, metallic bodies of the automated companions are stretched over with uniforms. Shielding their surfaces from hazardous environments, these clothing, made of disposable cellophane, soft textiles or expensive hard duty, heat-resistant fabrics, bring them even closer to their human coworkers, blending the organic and automated into a synthetic whole. The covered ‘bodies’ merge machine-human features and gestures, creating an assembly of yet unknown or transitory species.

Pakui Hardware - Creatures of Habit
SIC, August 5 - September 3

WADE GUYTON - SIAMO ARRIVATI, MADRE

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The Madre museum in Naples presents the first solo show in a public Italian institution devoted to Wade Guyton (Hammond, Indiana, 1972), one of the leading American and international artists of the latest generation. Since the early 2000s, Guyton’s works have explored the state and impact of the production and circulation of digital images, depicting the potential forms they take on as well as delineating the specific sensibilities and original languages they assume in the way they are globally shared. By updating the expressive and cognitive canons that can be traced back to the practices both of Pop and Conceptual Art during the second half of the twentieth century, Guyton employs a seemingly simple procedure in his artistic practice. Using ink jet printers, the artist applies a series of recurrent images, signs or motifs previously processed by programs such as Photoshop or Word to canvas or other materials. A dynamic relationship is created between unexpected superimpositions, mechanical errors and discrepancies during the printing phase, which is implied by the use of these tools and which the artist takes to the limits, challenging their specific functions. This enables Guyton to reveal the contingency of digital technology and to reveal its working codes. The conflicts of digital expression are made visible, leading us to reflect on the conditional nature of its visualisation created through the analog tools of the visual arts.

The works conceived by Guyton specifically for the exhibition at the Madre museum are the outcome of a residency in Naples of the artist and members of his work team. In line with his most recent research, these works are marked by the coexistence of minimal abstract forms, which have been a distinctive and almost constant feature of the artist’s work until his most recent exhibitions, and new figurative motifs that coincide with the deterioration of initially photographic images. These new figurative motifs are generated like bitmap files that have lost their original legibility and logical structure when placed in the chain of reductions or increases in resolution as well as in the transmission between the digital production mechanism and printing on canvas. These works reveal the intensified interaction between the primary elements of Guyton’s artistic research itself, based on the acquisition – using mobile phones, digital cameras, screenshots or scanners – of instantaneous images or reproductions from printed materials processed by software programs before being brought back to a print format on analog supports.

Arranged by the artist within the third floor of Madre, these works transform the solidity and the authority of the museum space into a welcoming place of daily work, a malleable and rewritable architectural loop. Like the transformation of the rooms of the museum into a workshop, which temporarily replaces his studio in New York, the residency of the artist and his team in Naples becomes the conceptual blueprint of a critical and (self-) analytical space-time framework, the setting for creating this new group of works in real time. In this way, Guyton reinterprets both the classic art- historical theme of the “studio” and the possible reference to the tradition of the Grand Tour. This also could explain the ironic and self-ironic plural title of the exhibition, SIAMO ARRIVATI (“WE’VE ARRIVED”), which is taken from the slogan used by McDonald’s to announce the recent opening of its restaurants in Naples. One could think of Guyton’s residency and exhibition in Naples as a potential allegory of the contemporary digital and global inter- and hyper-connection, and that he performs the possible outcomes by making a comparison with the history of a city situated at the center of the Mediterranean and therefore immersed, in itself, in thousands of layers of social, economic, political and cultural interconnections.

Curated by Andrea Viliani.
Photos by Amadeo Benestante.

Wade Guyton - Siamo Arrivati
Madre, May 15 - September 11
www.madrenapoli.it

BRASS TACKS - ANAT EBGI

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Organized by Ryan Wallace, Brass Tacks brings together artists who glean highly specific material spoils from the outside world to fuel and map their work environments. Drawing from piles of photograms, stacks of paper, shards of Perspex, spools of Targhee fibers, documentation of light reflections, measurements of body mass, and hoards of wooden furniture, all manner of actions are employed in forging the works in the show. Brass Tacks considers how from the mise-en-scène of the studio, subtractive selection is as informative as the additive actions that result in visible, finished, artworks. These eleven artists employ sculpture, ceramics, photography, collage, knitting, painting and glass blowing to address a variety of concerns while a spirit of place, accumulation, and editing pervades all.

Exhibiting Artists: Colby Bird, Patrick Brennan, Graham Collins, Channing Hansen, Elias Hansen, Joseph Hart, Sheree Hovsepian, Jason Bailer Losh, Matt Rich, Brie Ruais, Ryan Wallace.

Brass Tacks
Anat Ebgi, July 22 - August 19
www.anatebgi.com

T293 IN RESIDENCE AT LUCIANO BRITO GALERIA

Tris Vonna-Michell, Registers, 2017

Tris Vonna-Michell, Registers, 2017

Tris Vonna-Michell, Registers, 2017

Tris Vonna-Michell, Registers, 2017

Claire Fontaine, Via Tribunali 293, (22.03.2010), 2010

Claire Fontaine, Via Tribunali 293, (22.03.2010), 2010

Fabian Herkenhoener, Light footed fire crackers (detail), 2017

Fabian Herkenhoener, Light footed fire crackers (detail), 2017

Fabian Herkenhoener, Light footed fire crackers (detail), 2017

Fabian Herkenhoener, Light footed fire crackers (detail), 2017

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

The ambiguous relationship between appropriation, authorship and ready-made object and the equally delicate one between language, personal narrative and collective history: these are the themes that Claire Fontaine, Fabian Herkenhoener, Martin Soto Climent and Tris Vonna-Michell will examine in the exhibition ’t twoninethree in-residence at Luciana Brito Galeria’.

In Claire Fontaine’s works, the denial of authorship and originality is asserted through the appropriation and  re-elaboration of symbols, objects and images of the contemporary art culture with the aim of investigating the consequences of Capitalism on our society. Surely one of the most iconic artworks by the Paris-based collective, Via Tribunali 293, 22.03.2010  is the copy of the keys of the historical Neapolitan venue of the gallery: the decision to exhibit these ordinary objects in a different gallery and potentially available to anyone, translates the intention of using art as a device for the analysis and critique of socio-political issues such as the concept of private property. In God They Trust it’s a U.S. quarter that has been cut in half and outfitted with a folding box cutter blade. Not detectable by security controls it becomes a weapon that, despite being simple and small, feeds a paranoid fear of a potentially omnipresent violence. Written text is another crucial element in the artistic practice of Claire Fontaine who, coherently with her social critique, presents the text May Our Enemies Not Prosper written on the occasion of another exhibition, held in another gallery in 2016, revolving around the themes of violence and the refugee crisis.

Authorship is also a key word in the practice of Fabian Herkenhoener, who decided to confront it through the literary technique of the ‘cut-up’. Proposed for the first time by poet Tristan Tzara during a surrealist rally in the 1920s, it consists in the deconstruction of a primary text using the random cutting up of words and phrases to form new sentences with a new logical sense. Herkenhoener’s interpretation of this technique leads to a ‘processing text’, an expression he invented to explain his artistic research in which a random language is enriched by a biographical dimension (since he is the author of some of the original texts) and by a visual one where words and phrases take geometric forms or invade the canvas as grid-like structures that are meant to emphasize the mental and emotional dynamics that generated them. On the occasion of this show, Herkenhoener will create wall-based works using texts he has been writing during a trip in California and Mexico on his way to São Paulo.

In his surrealist-like creations Mexican artist Martin Soto Climent exploits the transformative potential of everyday objects and found materials to create new poetic forms in which these elements assume a new and deeper symbolic role. Through conceptual artistic strategies such as appropriation and juxtaposition, these objects are gently reassembled into collages, installations and sculptures that, in their simplicity, appear ready-made. Soto Climent’s amazing skill of interpreting the site-specific and conferring softness and sensuality to objects through minimal intervention takes shape through wall-based works where old clothes become pictorial tools and act as colors, lines and geometries on the surface of the canvases. New ways of interacting with reality to suggest new perspectives.

Though many of the works by Tris Vonna-Michell have clearly autobiographical traits, these are not employed in order to authenticate or legitimize the wroks but rather assist in anchoring the multifaceted socio-political and cultural-historical constellations in which certain imagineries can be produced. A consummate storyteller, Vonna-Michell elaborately constructs tales that include historical research and social observation filtered through personal adecdotes. His works are always context-specific and are constantly modified through slights interventions to create what he terms a ‘narrative of the form’. The version of Registers specifically created for this exhibition consists of an animated sequence of slides taken during a trip to Japan in 2008. All slides were taken in transient spaces such as underpasses, viaducts, stations, docks and are re-assembled into an anachronistic narrative which forces the viewer to move constantly backwards and forwards in time. The unmistakable, fast-moving voice of the artist accompanies the sequence of images along with a soundtrack which is the result of a montage of musical compositions by Antwerp-based artist/musician Jan Matthé.

t twoninthree in-residence at Luciana Brito Galeria is the second stage of a successful collaboration with the Brasilian gallery that held an exhibition in Rome in June 2017 presenting works by Héctor Zamora, Pablo Lobato and Rafael Carneiro.

Exhibiting artists: Claire Fontaine, Fabian Herkenhoener, Martin Soto Climent, Tris Vonna-Michell.  

t twoninthree in-residence at Luciana Brito Galeria
August 5 - September 9
www.t293.it

AMALIA ULMAN - MONDAY CARTOONS, DEBORAH SCHAMONI

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Amalia Ulman, Privilege 12/21/2015, 2016

Amalia Ulman, Privilege 12/21/2015, 2016

Amalia Ulman, Privilege 1/11/2016, 2016

Amalia Ulman, Privilege 1/11/2016, 2016

Amalia Ulman, Reclining Bob (Munich), 2017

Amalia Ulman, Reclining Bob (Munich), 2017

Amalia Ulman is presenting nine drawings of her ongoing series Monday Cartoons for her first show at Deborah Schamoni as well as new cartoons of Bob the Pigeon, which will be published in her forthcoming book, ‘A Job is a Job is a Job’.

Drawing became an integral part of Ulman’s practice in 2015, at the beginning of the US presidential election cycle, as one of the elements of her performance Privilege (2015-16) alongside photographs and videos. She taught herself to draw in order to satirize the single-panel (or ‘gag’) broadsheet cartoons of “failing” print outlets and cites the New Yorker’s Charles Barsotti as an important influence, as well as the Kastner and Partners ‘Red Bull Gives You Wings’ animations that comprise their twenty five year old energy drink campaign strategy.

Her drawings swoop from their pages to form part of her performance work Privilege started in October 2015 which follows on from her notorious instagram work, Excellences and Perfections. Both works toy with the staging and fabrication of identity but whereas in Excellences Ulman crafted a false persona based upon a lifestyle phenomenon she observed online, in Privilege she examines her own real aspirations and assumptions – those of a self-described South American “white-trash” woman, a feminist and a millennial ‘coastal elite’– and shines a light on the unbearable humiliation of being middle class. On the luxury of being white. The comforts of wealth and means are both romanticized and derided in a comedy of manners which exists not in the corridors of power, but in the cubicles of opportunity. Her protagonists, Amalia and Bob, ask us to consider who is in charge here? Are you in the business of cultural production? Well, take our card!

Bob, by the way, is a pigeon. A rock dove. The perfect urban underdog. But pigeons weren’t always the scourge of metropolitan society and have enjoyed many positions across history: messenger, meal, pet, sacrifice, sportsman and spy. The feral city pigeons of today are the descendants of refugees from long abandoned ‘dovecotes’ (traditional breeding houses introduced by the Romans to Britain, then later to mainland Europe), as reviled and Othered as any migrant or drifter.

The artist herself thinks of Bob as a kind of Holy Spirit (and pigeons are as pervasive as any manifestation of God, found everywhere on the planet except the polar icecaps) but in her work he waddles somewhere between being a personal assistant, confidante, trainee and lover. Ever the sidekick, never the boss.

As with previous projects she keeps to the confines of a strict colour palette – black, white and red. The template tones of white-collar news and propaganda, an austere rainbow of legitimacy. And as the performative aspects of labour shift from the cubicle to the cloud and middle-income inflation rises (but before all the robots take our jobs) Ulman asks us to consider our attitudes to the changing natures of work, caste, and lifestyle legitimacy from within (but pecking at) the traditional bounds of political visual communication.

To misquote Marvel Comics; with great draughtsmanship comes great responsibility. To wit, to woo.

Peace, bread and Bob. Pigeons united will never be defeated. 

Text by Ella Plevin.
Photography by Ulrich Gebert, all images copyright and courtesy of the artist and Deborah Schamoni, Munich.

Amalia Ulman - Monday Cartoons
eborah Schamoni, July 21 - September 19
www.deborahschamoni.com

OUT OF OFFICE - HAWAII-LISBON

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Aujourdhui x Hawaii Lisbon - 4.jpg
Pedro Matos, Untitled (Juxtaposition) 5, 2017

Pedro Matos, Untitled (Juxtaposition) 5, 2017

[This is an automatic Out of Office reply]

Hello!

Thank you for contacting Aujourd’hui. 

We are at the moment Out of Office at HAWAII-LISBON. 

You may reach us on August the 5th from 3-8pm at our pop-up exhibition featuring works by Pedro Matos, Teresa Braula Reis and Ricardo Passaporte.

Also, on this day don’t miss your chance to get your hands on the new Aujourd’hui exclusive limited edition T-shirts whilst enjoying branded ice creams and refreshing cocktails.

For any urgent matters during our absence please contact HAWAII-LISBON on info(at)hawaii-lisbon(dot)com

The exhibition can be visited by appointment until August 26th.

Sunny regards, 
Aujourd’hui


Exhibiting artists: Pedro Matos, Ricardo Passaporte, Teresa Braula Reis.
Photography by Maria Rita, courtesy of the artists, Hawaii-Lisbon and Aujourd'hui.

Out of Office - Aujourd'hui on holiday at Hawaii-Lisbon
Hawaii-Lisbon, August 5th - August 26th
www.hawaii-lisbon.com

OLIVIER KOSTA-THÉFAINE - ARIA DI ROMA, VILLA MEDICI

RGS_5909.JPG

(…) I m going outside of the Villa to observe the details from the city-museum and abroad. There is what the tourist goes to see, with the help of his city guide, and what i decide to look at. Some little monuments composed with shells found on the beach try to compete with the Renaissance decorative conchs visible on Palace and fountains in the historic city center. A Pope face coffee mug, different types of cheap souvenirs gift for tourists. And everyday, a different decor, a sky with blazing colors :a painting from the Renaissance or a reproduction made in China of a Roman sky. An anti-intrusion fence reveal another potential and act as a pause time. A concrete block found in the Corviale take the name "Palazzo", while the precious wood from the big centenary pine is transformed into small furniture from the mass retail. Traces on city walls as much of "potential-paintings", some abandoned objects, found, collected into the Bosco or in San Vittorio. Aria di Roma is Neuilly-Sarcelles, both Versailles's suburbs told by flowers, and Ponentino, this refreshing gift coming directly from the suburbs…

- O.K-T, 2017

Photos by Pierluigi di Pietro.

Olivier Kosta-Théfaine - Aria Di Roma (part of in Swimming is Saving - curated by Chiara Parisi).
Villa Medici, July 13 - August 17
www.villamedici.it

Bora Akinciturk - We’re already dead, we just don’t know it yet, Ultrastudio

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Rage, 2017

Rage, 2017

Lyef, 2017

Lyef, 2017

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Devotion, 2017

Devotion, 2017

A 3d Keanu Reeves as Neo from The Matrix lies on a gurney, shirtless with electrodes attached to his chest and a transparent oxygen mask on his face. He’s in what looks like an emergency room. There are three nurses, two Asian women and a cartoon tiny winged donkey-man. Neo hears a text to speech bot whispering “What if he took both pills?” 
“He would lose all memory of what the Matrix is and who Morpheus and Trinity are and he would wake up in his pod, having no recollection of how he got there. He would then be rescued by people he did not recognise or had only seen in a dream. So – taking both pills would cause him to forget there even was a choice of pills to begin with.”
On the TV Ellen DeGeneres shows her audience this new invention from Japan, a vase like thing with both ends open. It’s something to shout into and it mumbles your scream. 
“I wish I had that on election night” she says. 
Crowd loves it, laughing ecstatically. 
Later she’s dancing with a plush mannequin to a slowed down version of Justin Timberlake’s “Rock Your Body” song. 
Crowd goes “Aww”
The moral of the story here is that pain becomes pleasure as pleasure becomes sadness. Or something like that. Time passes. And it’s just another system. Like Neo, if you take both pills you wake up from the Matrix unconscious. Awake without a purpose. A dog without a bone. Into this world you’re thrown.

Bora Akinciturk - We’re already dead, we just don’t know it yet
Ultrastudio, June 25 - August 20
www.ultrastudio.sexy

Azar Alsharif and Pedro Henriques - GOLDEN GRAIN, SYNTAX

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Azar Alsharif, Untitled, 2013 

Azar Alsharif, Untitled, 2013 

Pedro Henriques, Sharking, 2017 

Pedro Henriques, Sharking, 2017 

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Pedro Henriques, Untitled, Precise Parts, 2015 

Pedro Henriques, Untitled, Precise Parts, 2015 

We find ourselves ingrained in a realm of abstracted representations. A tangible reality as we once knew it, has been rendered obsolete. It has shifted towards a virtual comprehension of our surrounding; it has been altered into a landscape, which has been gradually virtualised and post produced into supposedly real images of who we are and what we might, or already have become. The world’s surface has been covered by layers of such images ? flickering, illuminated and continuously circulating similes that now appear to be the world’s exterior coat. Reality was lost in the digital and the dj’d archive of its past, as has the idea of the authentic image, object or the remix of a true self. Contemporary representations of the real today, are representations of the equally non-real archival families of older and the already post produced depictions of initial objects/subjects, fabricated from the many times appropriated and the virtual, the reality of which, is now no longer at stake. “The tools of postproduction here are not made at achieving a representation of reality. They have become means of creating images and a world in their wake.”

Deep under the surface these images however still exist. Although archaic in form and in the singularity of their content, they now only endure as preconditions for their later becoming and transfigurations. Some have become new representations or backdrops, others have become victims of their own reconfiguration and translation, resulting in new hybridised settings or into three dimensional materialisations. It might feel dated. After all it is an exhibition of images, of representations and of small realities, the misplacement, replacement and transformation of which however, serves us as a tool, allowing us to question contemporary principles of representation, the abstraction of appearance and the speed of disappearance.

Curated by Markéta Stará Condeixa.
Photos by Bruno Lopes. 

Azar Alsharif and Pedro Henriques - Golden Grain
Syntax, July 7 - September 23
www.syntaxproject.org

HUBERT MAROT - GOING­-GONE, Galerie Anne de Villepoix

You could see here a direct reference to Michel Foucault's "androgynous images," which he defined in his text called Photogenic painting, written in 1975 for Gérard Fromager's monographic catalogue. These images combine mediums and categories, and bear testimony to the free relationship between photography and painting. Such is the very substance of Hubert Marot's work in his exhibition GOING­GONE. His first cyanotypes already conjugated photographic process with pictorial rendition. Here, his latest series introduces color as an element of variation, allowing a shift from negative to task. Color appears, driving the rhythm and, little by little, becomes the subject.

Around this queen­Image, whose nuances vary depending on the application time of the liquid emulsion, there is a whole ecosystem of ceramics in enamel, which has also stood the test of time. They turn into solid objects a state of evolution, of degradation. Hybridity still rules, hubcaps melt and become clocks, and scooter seats, lacerated and mended, become, once hung up on the wall, a series of ancient masks.

There is then, in its very technicality, in the invariability of the dried out result, a contained and sealed process of alteration. If matter is adorned with color variations, the intention is entirely focused on time, what it allows, what it dilates, what it forgets. In this work of patience, a softening phenomenon occurs. Before it is fixed, matter has distended, like the close­up of the chewed­up chewing gum on the canvas prints, the ceramics have become limp, waiting for time to pass. A metallic structure, built like a bus shelter, hosts a looped projection of anonymous men who have the patience to rub their car's bodywork until it shines, another reminiscence that this is all, once again, about the passing of time.

We feel like we're in a slow motion movie, in a vinyl record set to the wrong number of turns per minute. In the seriality and repetition of the objects presented here, seats, hubcaps, images, there is the same mechanics as in the mastication of chewing gum, the same fatality, the same latency. And yet, what saves everyone from being swallowed by this great machine is, in the end, the un­reproductability of this work. In "each moment in time is unique" there is "each process is unique," and therefore each result. Repetition doesn't rob the image of its singularity, on the contrary, it allows it to vary in its unicity through gesture, for the obsession with reproduction is also the obsession with its failure. An outrageously oiled machinery.

Text by Elisa Rigoulet.

Hubert Marot - GOING-GONE
Galerie Anne de Villepoix, July 1 - September 2
www.annedevillepoix.com