Josh Sperling - Chasing Rainbows, Galerie Perrotin

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Perrotin Paris is proud to present “Chasing Rainbows,” Josh Sperling’s rst exhibition with the gallery. The exhibition brings together a number of new works by the New York-based artist: composites—or shaped canvases and plywood panels—a series of monochrome canvas reliefs, and a large-scale installation.  

Sperling’s dynamic clusters of brightly colored forms blur the lines between painting and sculpture, image and object. Though each shaped canvas is distinct, it relies on other forms in the eld for compositional coherence and energy. Often asymmetrical and happily off-kilter, a cluster is always satisfying in its surprising arrangement. In Poppycock (2017), three ovals compete for prominence in the center of the composition, shuf ing and re-shuf ing before settling into a makeshift pile. A maroon arch buttresses them, cradling them into stillness. These snaking forms—“squiggles”—appear throughout Sperling’s work and act, alternately, as instigators and appeasers of movement: the maelstrom of forms that characterizes Sperling’s work. To execute a single “squiggle,” sheets of plywood are laid on top of each other, resembling a topographical model, before they are covered in canvas and painted over in Sperling’s signature palate
of saturated, sometimes clashing colors. The ridges of the wooden armature, visible through the canvas, add sculptural contrast to Sperling’s interest in atness—of color, of form.

In Lovey Dovey (2017), a blue trident eclipses a pink orb. The overlap is rendered in a marbling of the two tones. So intense is the collision of shape and color, force against force, that the surface collapses and the colors co-mingle. Over this eclipse of forms, a single curve arches like an eyebrow in an expression of alarm, or like a crescent moon presiding over the collision and framing the event. Dots, one red and one white, act as a kind of punctuation. They are the only seemingly stable forms in an otherwise mercurial landscape of shape, color, and relation. Everything appears on the verge of balance, suspended precariously before it might tumble and fall into a new con guration. Motion seems imminent.

Sperling’s range of in uences is broad. Frank Stella and his shaped canvases are clear predecessors for the meticulously crafted supports over which Sperling stretches his canvases. In this, Sperling resembles another American abstractionist, Ellsworth Kelly, whose signature hard-edge shapes took near-sculptural form in his later work; no longer the subject, they became the object itself, dictating its edges and its projection into space. Sperling picks up where his precursors left off, combining the concerns of painting—color and composition—with the spatial potential of sculpture. Whereas Kelly and Stella’s forms are unwaveringly stark, Sperling’s are sinuous and surprising. 

The artist cites “Googie” signage, the exuberant graphic fad of the 50s —Jetsons-y asterisks and boomerangs—as an in uence. Sperling’s forms communicate a comparable uplift of feeling, both in color and in contour. Also in Sperling’s aesthetic lineage is the short-lived Memphis furniture trend of the 80s. (Sperling was born in ‘84.) That movement’s postmodern all-things-go design philosophy disavowed “good taste” and touted improbable shapes and outrageous colors instead. Sperling is as steeped in design as he is in art history, and borrows from both. More canonical sources like Jean Arp’s kidney-shaped wall-reliefs, for instance, or the motion lines surrounding Keith Haring’s gures are also echoed in

Sperling’s vocabulary of forms. This diversity of associations is to Sperling’s credit: his ability to marshal a great number of varied references deftly and seamlessly into a single work and a total oeuvre. He is capable of reverence without conceding originality or energy. The works in this exhibition are no exception, as they straddle painting and sculpture daringly, venturing from the wall and intruding into the space joyfully.

Text by Danny Kopel.

Josh Sperlin - Chasing Rainbows
Galerie Perrotin, January 10 - February 24
www.perrotin.com
 

Ida Ekblad - Proper Stuff, Herald St

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These four works sum up the mood I’ve been in for the past few months. I've been reminiscing about my family when I was growing up, the trips we made cross-country skiing on glowing slopes in the Norwegian pitch-black winter, I remember we were thirsty with no water in the mountains and being told: 'if you are thirsty, drink your spit' but in a loving way. Then camping in moist green plastic tents in the forest in summer and trips abroad - five kids melted onto brown vinyl seats in a mustard yellow Volkswagen mini bus on the motorways from Oslo town to Venice, Italy and discovering on arrival this small shop filled with Murano glass objects, its trippy vases burning themselves into my child-brain, now literally burned by my heaters onto my canvas or linen, making surely sure I won't forget. My sister and I bought a small glass object each; colourful glass candy and a fish, proper tourists.

'Never let you see me down'. I've been thinking about what our various flats looked like growing up, the pine furniture, the record players, black vinyl 45's with dust dancing on them in the sun and the sound they made when the record was over. I've been looking at my drawings my Dad kept for me and at slides of us, my sister, him, me, which he handed over to me recently. I guess these works are rich with references which mostly only make sense to me. There's the 'TUFF' part of a CRY TUFF record in a painting which doesn't actually reveal the name of the song I've been listening to, 'Gimmie' by Errol Holt. Another painting sort of holds parts of the graphics from a Sussex Records by The Decisions just because I like those shapes and colours and nonetheless their song 'You look like an angel' is real beautiful too.

These new works sure are richer than rich with material, yes so heavy with industrial bucket loads of Plastisol and expanding medium weighing them down so I cannot carry them much longer. This final mixture of my so-called chunky 'Puffy-paint', is applied with any kind of abused brushes or moulded, squeezed, smudged, clubbed and harassed onto the canvas with my hands. 'Poesy snuffed by decor?' Decor snuffed by Poesy!' The battle is on, and at the slightest resistance, the first «word» of complaint, they are squelched, fined, vilified, muffled, harassed, hunted down, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, blown, deported, sacrificed, betrayed, sold. Finally these works have been through some decent heating and baking in my studio by means of industrial heaters as the plastic won't harden otherwise. I like watching the plastic grow like mushrooms when it's heated, baking and boiling like heroin in a spoon. 

Text by Ida Ekblad.

Ida Ekblad - Proper Stuff
Herald St, November 25 - January 28
www.heraldst.com

Voyage au bout de la nuit - THE COURT

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THE COURT, the newly created concept space in Pescara, has the pleasure to present the first exhibition project Voyage au bout de la nuit curated by Maurizio Vicerè - Vice and with the participation of the artists Cosimo Casoni, Andrea Martinucci and Marco Strappato. The exhibition will take place in the new Law Firm Di Pietro - Lucchi in Piazza della Rinascita, 24 Pescara. THE COURT is a project designed to find opportunities for encounter between visual artists and intellectuals through literary works among the most recognized of the 21st century. For this first edition we have tried to develop a meeting between the artists Casoni, Martinucci, Strappato and the fundamental work Voyage au bout de la nuit - Journey to the end of the night - by author Louis Ferdinand Celine. It will then start from the very title of the novel as an exclusive material of reflection and left to the free interpretation of artists. It is no coincidence that the three artists have been chosen to work with convergence points and conceptual proximity to amplify the aura of Celiniana's work, unique in its genre and inspiration for most modern and contemporary literature. The Journey and the Night are therefore the edges that limit the presence of a whole where chaos occurs through the impossibility of a linear path since, while it is true that time moves in one direction, the same cannot be said of man who through two infinite - the inner one and the one just out of the body - keep alive the unconsciousness of moving with freedom, singular ways and reactions. The same applies to Celine's "Travel" crossed by the singular prophetic cynicism of Ferdinand Bardamu anti-hero who through the author finds himself absorbed by a part of the world that he will never understand . The only glimmer, the only certainty, the only morsel of salvation and sometimes beauty is the night, she alone accompanies him on a journey to the limits of human existence.

THE COURT is a curatorial project conceived and developed by the artist Maurizio Vicerè – Vice in collaboration with the Law Firm Di Pietro, Lucchi in Pescara, where visual artists will be invited to relate to the intellectual work of international writers.

Exhibiting artists: Cosimo Casoni, Andrea Martinucci, Marco Strappato
Curated by Maurizio Vicerè.

Voyage au bout de la nuit
THE COURT, December 15 - February 25
www.thecourtspeaks.com

Irene Kopelman - Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Irene Kopelman, Indexing Water, Kunsthalle Lissabon

A few centuries ago, art and science were not such different and separate fields, as we know them today. They had many points of correlations and coexistence. As practitioners in the art field we are aware of the color studies in art history, but color dictionaries were also developed in the field of natural studies as a means of describing and communicating the examination of nature. In 1831, Charles Darwin carried a book called The Nomenclature of Colors aboard the HMS Beagle. Scientists used this book and other “color dictionaries”, predecessors of today’s Pantone swatch books, as a common reference when describing the appearance of whatever they were studying. Color Dictionaries were designed to give people around the world a common vocabulary to describe the colors of everything, from rocks and flowers to stars, birds and postage stamps. They afforded scientists and naturalists the means of descriptive biological precision that could be easily shared so naturalists in Kalamazoo and Germany could communicate effectively about a family of birds found in both places in related (but different) forms. They typically consisted of a set of color swatches; each assigned a name (usually rendered in several languages, to facilitate international use), an identifying number, and an often-lyrical description of the color (“the color of the blood of a freshly killed rabbit” or “mummy brown”).

Once I had decided, by discussing the ideas with Luis and João, that we would go for it, I contacted Dr. Marcel Wernand, a physical oceanographer at NIOZ (Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research). Dr. Marcel R. Wernand is a senior research scientist whose main research interests combine the design and development of multi-spectral ocean color instrumentation; bio-optical variability of estuaries, seas and oceans, long-term monitoring of coastal color; long-term changes of ocean color in relation to global change and marine-optical science history. This very particular combination of approaches, summed with a very particular personality made the dialogue from the beginning extremely interesting and enriching. It turned that Marcel was not only a very knowledgeable researcher but also a great story teller. His research had taken him all across the globe, seen many waters and coming across many people. His interest in the history of color studies is what makes it come all alive to me.

The interviews with Marcel become the very core of the project. I kept studying papers, looking at books, getting more involved in the topic to the extreme of joining and participating in a congress of the Ocean Darkening Project. The amount of information started becoming overwhelming and I realized that it had started being more constraining than inspiring. I then realized that the most interesting thing I had in my hands was the conversations with Marcel. His stories, the mental space that all that information was creating in the dialogue with him. I decided then that I would follow that quality. Keep talking to him, recording the interviews, letting the information float and taking notes of images that would materialize from the conversations. The narrative of the conversations became the script of the exhibition as well as the artist book we will publish.

As the conversations were too broad, I proposed Marcel to take the color scale he uses in his studies as a guideline. The scale he still uses is called a Forel-Ule scale. François-Alphonse Forel (1841 –1912) developed the method, and was three years later extended with greenish brown to cola brown colors by the German limnologist Wilhelm Ule (1861 – 1940). The scale has 21 colors. I proposed Marcel to talk color by color. He proposed to group them. One day about blues, one day about greens, yellows and browns. Dissecting the scale by colors helped me better understand the factors affecting the color of the water.

Photos by Bruno Lopes.

Irene Kopelman - Indexing Water
Kunsthalle Lissabon, December 13 - February 17
www.kunsthalle-lissabon.org

Dominic Samsworth - Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Installation view, Dominic Samsworth, Return to Trash Island, Supplement

Supplement is pleased to present the first solo exhibition in London by Dominic Samsworth. Samsworth works across painting, sculpture and installation. His past exhibitions have challenged and critiqued the gallery as a ‘leisure environment’, exploring the idea of the gallery as a symptom of the extravagances and excess of consumer lifestyle. For the exhibition Samsworth has created an installation that spreads across the entirety of the floor accompanied by two large wall works.

Samsworth’s paintings are large, bold, monochromatic works on shaped canvas that are rendered in aqua blues and greens, sun bleached yellows and oranges or faded pastel pinks. He uses industrial paints, ranging from rubber pool coatings to single stage automotive finishes. Their rich pigment, glossy lustre and flexibility are utilised to create a highly polished finish of the painted surface. His paintings relate to minimalism and post-painterly abstraction, retaining the austerity and material formalities of abstract and colour field painting whilst incorporating the language of product and architectural design. For Samsworth, eliminating distraction and reducing painting to a few key elements – form, colour, surface – is essential.

In an on-going series of paintings known as the ‘Pool Paintings’ Samsworth has appropriated catalogue designs of domestic swimming pools, shaping the canvas and its composition to follow the pool’s design. His shaped canvases move into the territory of sculpture, with shape and form dictating the overall image. Despite the paintings’ highly polished surfaces the raw canvas itself remains a persistent presence, as a reminder of their material nature and Samsworth’s commitment to the medium.

Samsworth has further explored this by displaying his canvases on the floor of the gallery, leaning against the wall, situating the work between painting and sculpture. Samsworth’s ‘Parasol Paintings’, displayed as part of the wall installation in the exhibition mimic the two-dimensional rendering of three-dimensional objects, flatting their forms in perspective. Here the ‘Parasol Paintings’ pull away from abstraction to become a representational image of the object itself, in both form and content. The paintings are set upon a band of ‘blue-back’ paper that runs the length of the gallery walls, suggesting a horizon line. The paper is the type used for advertisement billboards, to block out an underlying image for the next advert to be displayed.

Across the gallery’s floor is an installation made from an array of sea plastics, the pale, sun-bleached waste of capitalism. Sculptural arrangements of objects and materials can be found within the mass of materials, the assemblages drawing attention to the contrast between idealised images of luxurious beach resorts and the precariousness of global coastlines, sites of disaster wrought by a changing climate that is the result of consumer culture.

Dominic Samsworth - Return to Trash Island
Supplement, November 18 - January 6
www.supplementgallery.co.uk

TOMORROW IS OBSOLETE - SOYUZ

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Tomorrow is Obsolete. By putting tomorrow in the past tense, the show that gathers artists Joachim Coucke and Nicolas Pelzer tells us about a world where digital technology, Internet and social networks are not a projected and fantasized image anymore, but a physical envelope. Between abandoned vestiges and morphology of data, both their works try to restore a physicality to the immaterial.

Today the world dreams about an artificial and superior intelligence which would manage our stewardship, granting more time for us, more options? In fact, Tristan Harris, a former product philosopher at Google affirms the absolute opposite : “Thousand of hours are just stolen from people lives”. This principle of dispersion which makes us waste our time and vanishes our first intentions by moving them permanently, replaces the cult of technology at the heart of its first question: what it contains, what it produces, what remains of it.

To the digital which the representation would be obsolete today, Joachim Coucke and Nicolas Pelzer oppose the material, the physical barrier of a world the body naturally comes to stumble against. The body yes, a crucial unit of measure here, because it is about bringing everything back to a human scale. What becomes the appearance of a world whose data is deprived of forms? Would Internet have profoundly changed the aesthetics of what surrounds us?

From here on out, both artists propose a morphology of the technology. Joachim Coucke’s wall installations sculptures present in at the same time opened and locked crates, the archeological content of a used system. The anarchic mixing of the elements put forward the damaged relationship between the material life and the digital practices. feeds, made of hundreds of cables, which drip from the ceiling to the ground and make knots then. Unlike its claimed full discharge principle, the data’s combination circulation leaves at the time of the digital the physical traces of a discomfort, the remains of a movement which lost its fluidity. In his technological timeline, Nicolas Pelzer thinks about the evolution of forms and tools in the context of the digital, simulated here by an algorithm which recreated from a 3D software on a fabric surface in 3D print the traces of a prehistoric stone’s use. In the same way, his aluminum lamps take back an invention of the 19th century through the recent technology of the laser cut.

As reincarnated carcasses, these envelopes are the physical realization of a state that we experiment in our daily lives, stuck between the promises of the progress and the fragility of our consciousness seduced by the advertising, the notifications and the simplified uses. A digital world seen as a material of yesterday, archeological instrument, document of historic study and homemade shape, scrutinized and remodeled to collect and extract from it the esthetic power of an exhausted post-internet representation.

Text by Elisa Rigoulet.
Exhibiting artists: Joachim Coucke and Nicolas Pelzer.

Tomorrow Is Obsolete
SOYUZ, December 2 - 30
www.the-soyuz.org

THE BROWSING CHAMBER - TORCH GALLERY

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The Browsing Chamber explores the relation between process-based artists and the contemporary image culture. Five young international talents will exhibit works in a salon-style exhibition that will cover the entire surface of the backspace of the gallery, from floor to ceiling.  All participating artists make process-based abstract works, which relate to painting in a systematic manner. These young artists are inspired by their largely digital surroundings and the way images are indexed on the Internet. The neatly organized grids of images provided by search engines have become a point of first contact for people interested in the work of an artist. This exhibition strategy can be viewed as a three-dimensional interpretation of a google image search. Entering the backspace should speak of human scale and our interaction with artworks grounded in their materials.

For The Browsing Chamber, Dutch painter Gijs van Lith selected four artists who create works that connect with his own brand of process-based abstraction. One can discern a loosely connected group of artists who are looking for non-figurative visual languages that find their origin in the collision of mechanical repetition and the act of creating. They are searching for 'glitches' or unexpected results of analogue and digital systems. By repeating gestures to the point of fatigue small deviations from a self-imposed grid appear. These unavoidable imperfections result in works that appear very dynamic and expressive while their origin is very strict and conceptual. Many of the artists work with the idea of creative destruction. Destroying something that already exists leads to a wide range of new starting points. This is an idea that has taken ground in the discourse concerning painting itself. A young generation of artists is picking up the shards of the wreck of the medium to rearrange them into something new. 

Exhibiting artists: Steven Cox, Samuel François, Ina Gerken, Gijs van Lith, Pierre Obando
Curated by Gijs van Lith.

The Browsing Chamber
TORCH GALLERY, November 25 - January 6
www.torchgallery.com

Barbara Kruger - Forever, Sprüth Magers

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Sprüth Magers presents FOREVER, a new site-specific work by Barbara Kruger. For this installation, which occupies all four walls and the floor of the Berlin gallery’s main exhibition space, the artist has created one of her immersive room-wraps and several new vinyl works. Their boldly designed textual statements on the nature of truth, power, belief and doubt embody the distinctive visual language that Kruger has developed over the course of her forty-year career. This exhibition at Sprüth Magers, Berlin, marks exactly three decades since her first solo show at Monika Sprüth Gallery in Cologne.

Since the late 1970s, Kruger has established herself as one of the most influential figures in contemporary art. Beginning with her earliest works, for which she combined language with mass media imagery culled from books and magazines, she has turned a critical eye toward consumerism, desire, political will, and the often-hidden mechanisms of power operating within contemporary society. In the mid-1990s, Kruger produced her first multichannel video works and room-wrappings, tapping into a long-standing interest in architecture and expanding the scale of her installations to envelop viewers in disorienting, but thought-provoking, environments. Her exhibition in Berlin extends these investigations, which are as timely as ever in a moment pervaded by pseudo-facts and alternative realities.

Barbara Kruger - Forever
Sprüth Magers, September 16 – December 22
www.spruethmagers.com

Fenêtreproject - No Minimum Presence Required, Malta Contemporary Art

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The new Sustainable Development Goals (SGD) acknowledge the value of public space in creating sustainable cities. By looking at existing methodologies and considering additional indicators on accessibility, cities may find an effective path for meeting their goals. Successful town planning incorporates public areas to provide critical space for residents to breath and maintain an active life.
(Source: The City Fix™, produced by World Resources Institute Ross Center)

Pantheism lingers in the spills and chunks of human leftovers as they form their own visceral landscape. Pulsating stains meander, crawling in a land of no men. The images of the ghostly, shelled sceneries consist of man-made artifacts only– objects with gestural traces with a lifespan somewhere between ephemeral and beyond any registration of time.

We are thoroughly acquainted with these spaces, these corporate settings and tokens of urban planning, chopped and screwed out of context and locality, scattered like jack straw sticks. Even in their segregated state, their embedded codes are pleasantly familiar. Remarkably, traces of human interactions intercept these vistas – cloth and clothing, lights left on. Elsewhere, lusciously draped disposable terry is stuck in the flaps of a seductively bulging pleather chair.

The ceiling-mounted centerpiece towers god-like above all, in gleaming info point- green, commanding to look up to it, wanting attention, promising guidance. The message it holds drags one in and promptly spills one out again. Its proclamation longs to dissolve into something bigger than itself – directional guidance needed yet rejected, wanted yet muted.  Snap out of it, look for it elsewhere.

A signage system which is comprehensible for all users, forms the basis of efficient communication. Intuitively comprehensible signs assist citizens in their spatial orientation in complex buildings or areas such as airports, train stations or large office buildings.
(Source: A- Design Infosystems AG)

Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method based on the estimated useful life, i.e. five years (hitherto ten years for office furniture and equipment and four to five years for office machines and hardware).
(Source: EUR-Lex Access to European Union law)

An array of office grays are gathered here, soothing shades of stony metal hues, a reception committee of cabinets, shelving units assembled.  Show yourself in. The group offers fair, performance-related and competitive remuneration, extensive fringe benefits, wide-ranging professional development opportunities and new promotion prospects in new, more flexible units, bonus systems.
(Source: europarl.europa.eu)

Show yourself in. The vast land of corporate interior invites participation, a wish for access to be granted. The polished flooring reflects light on every surface.  Cleanliness is next to godliness. Buttery yellow LED light guides one through rooms in all shades of muffled glory, upwards and upwards it leads. Promise awaits ( the higher the floor the closer to god). Once there, up, one looks down on other businesses, built from reassuringly similar building material and color, reassuringly like-minded, poured over the horizon, dissolving in compounds.

An installation of drivers for non-recognized hardware will cause a blue screen when booting. A kernel memory dump will be generated as soon as a bluescreen appears and unless otherwise specified saved as MEMORY.DMP
(Source: support.microsoft.com)

The seductively rich canvas’ succulent blue lures you in. Attitudes rather than objects, they hug the engraved enigmatic lines. Blue screens that whisper familiar confessions. Vulnerable thoughts confidently lit, their assertiveness provides shelter for kindred spirits, securely locking them in bolted acrylic.

The roadmap looks into a possible expansion of improvements to the current guidelines, including development of a model confidentiality agreement to support the sharing of confidential information under a range of EU-US regulatory cooperation projects.
(Source: European Commission press release database)

Text by Eva Bühler and Melanie Bühler.

Fenêtreproject - No Minimum Presence Required
Malta Contemporary Art, November 24 - January 13
www.maltacontemporaryart.com
 

Ugo Rondinone - Good Evening Beautiful Blue, The Bass Museum of Art

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Spanning the entirety of the museum’s newly designed second floor, good evening beautiful blue by Ugo Rondinone is part of a major multi-institution retrospective comprising works that span three decades of the artist’s practice, from the late 1990s to the present. From poetic installations in public spaces to life-size drawings, Rondinone’s work balances on the edge of euphoria and detachment.

good evening beautiful blue begins with Rondinone’s clockwork for oracles II (2008). The multi-wall installation is comprised of 52-mirrored windows (one for each week in the year) set against a backdrop of whitewashed pages from a local newspaper. Visitors encounter their mirrored reflections, stopping momentarily to contemplate how their temporary presence in the room contrasts with the dated newsprint behind the windows, which becomes more distant throughout the duration of the exhibition. The subsequent gallery houses vocabulary of solitude (2014-2016), the centerpiece of the exhibition and the only work present in all venues of the retrospective. vocabulary of solitude is an installation of 45 life-size clown figures cast from 22 men and 23 women of various ages and ethnicities. The work takes inspiration from the artist’s reflection on his daily actions, where each figure is engaged in a different quotidian activity, such as sleeping, dreaming, remembering, showering and walking.

Marking its first appearance in the U.S. in nearly two decades, the final gallery presents an immersive six-channel video installation titled It’s late It’s late and the wind carries a faint sound as it moves through the trees. It could be anything. The jingling of little bells perhaps, or the tiny flickering out of tiny lives. I stroll down the sidewalk and close my eyes and open them and wait for my mind to go perfectly blank. Like a room no one has ever entered, a room without any doors or windows. A place where nothing happens. (1998). The entire room is given a blue tint by an illuminated ceiling, as projected slow-motion loops of six men and six women, alone in their frames, perform an unresolved gesture without acknowledging the viewer, like opening an apartment door, or floating (or sinking) in water. The final line of the work’s narrative title …A place where nothing happens. aptly describes the cyclical loop of movements performed by each figure, resulting in a thought provoking and introspective space. Together, the selection of works places the visitor in an arena of contemplation and introspection, confronted by installations that stimulate self-reflection.

Photos by Zachary Balber, courtesy of The Bass Museum of Art and the artist. 

Ugo Rondinone - Good Evening Beautiful Blue
The Bass Museum of Art, October 29 - February 19
www.thebass.org

Nicolás Lamas - The Form Of Decay, P/////AKT

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Nicolás Lamas’ practice mainly includes found objects, installations and sculptures that focus on the transitory and hybrid nature of reality. For his first solo exhibition in Amsterdam he presents a dismantled production site interconnected with a series of objects that seem not to belong here. Using cognitive tensions between consumed and wasted energy, the show reflects on the transitory condition of matter as embedded in a system of ephemeral and divergent relations.

The form of decay is a new installation placed somewhere between an office space and an anthropological site. Through the detachment of man-made items, organic materials and mass-produced objects from their original functions, the exhibition recreates an ambience both wild and aseptic. There is a sense of strangeness floating in the air in which material interactions, frictions, attractions and repulsions coexist, showing Lamas’ interest in visceral materiality. When one moves through the space it becomes aware of the entangled processes that constitute this place. Matter is here an alibi that allows the viewer to address transience as intrinsic to the general state of things, bringing to light today’s cult to the perpetual circulation of energy, while triggering suspense.

The installation is structured around the encounters between a series of objects belonging to distant times and spaces, where notions of indeterminacy, danger and uncertainty become apparent. An energy of sorts entangled in a complex set of interconnected functions.

The project was developed in dialogue with Alejandro Alonso Díaz.
Photos by Charlott Markus, Alexandra Colmenares Cossio and Valeria Marchesini, all images copyright and courtesy of the artist and P/////AKT, Amsterdam

Nicolás Lamas - The Form Of Decay
P/////AKT, November 19 - December 17
www.pakt.nu

ANNA GRAMACCIA - DAYSLEEPERS, NAM PROJECT

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Gray outlines of dancing shadows become hazy through the fogged windows, and the glares of the night start to melt into one another. 
It’s time to close your eyelids, yield to the fattery of a welcoming sleep and let dreams bump into your drowsy, kissable smile.
While the bothersome buzz of the waking city greets a new day, echoing around you.
Noises down the road move into a whisper that the wind takes away, repeating the same strange words like the echo of a menacing litany.
The experience of time is a fast moving target.
It vanishes near the horizon as past dawns become the sunsets of the present.
The longer we test our senses through fltered rather than frst-hand experience, the more our being in the world becomes ‘more vitreous than visceral’.
The day comes to you asking questions whose answers have already been written, too unfocused in their message.
A lot of what is behind the flaments of our thoughts remains hidden, needing to be found, like a thread of a woolen sweater that once pulled reveals its ground zero.
There are moments that do not give yourself enough chance to realize how much time you spend - how much you challenge it - dragging yourself within four walls.
Just one day, a week or maybe even a month, judging by the biting cold air you can breathe outside now.
Only to the lure of the night is allowed the vanity of stitching the disjunctures, in a muffed, sleepless and soundless limping.
Intimacy’s murmured fragilities become props for the stories that the night tells, darkness gives the permission to be present. Night renegotiates its essence as a private space, the last trusted heaven from an always more motionless world.
It’s that time where many layers need to be removed and revealed and you can only do your best to keep them together and not let them fall to pieces. Like small fragments of thin frayed paper, thoughts soar in the air. Now you can smell them, touch them and - if you’re lucky enough - even see them for a moment.
Look around you. You fnd yourself in a wide room with a rough grey foor. No windows.
The walls are a blazing white, even more glowing under the ray of fickering light that runs along the ceiling. Three monochromatic small monoliths spread out in the middle of the space, discreetly inviting you to walk around them.
Something disturbing runs through the skin on your fngers, in the eyes of your mind, a tingling stating its urge to exist.
The pressure of desire for discovery secretly invites insomnia.
And you can fnally dream, awake.

Text by Marialuisa Pastò

Anna Gramaccia - Daysleepers
NAM Project, November 22 - December 28
www.namproject.com

Sebastian Burger
 - A song from under the floorboards, GRAND TOUR STUDIO

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Sebastian Burger’s point-of-view is metaphorically constituted by the frame, understood as a closed system which includes everything present in images and their signs, in the postures and gestures – visible and invisible – which are at the same time formed and unformed according to geometric schemas, relationships of light and shadow, chromatic variations and sharp outlines, ‘deframing’ and archetypes of a certain kind of cinema derived from the painterly. In this regard, much like in Robert Wiene’s 1920 film Das Cabinet des Dr.Caligari, the representational effect of the scenographic, plastic and stylistic solutions adopted, instead of being absorbed and hidden – as is usually the case in photographic realism – is revealed and emphasized, overcharging the single frame with expressive graphic and linear elements. Wiene’s film in fact represents perhaps the high point of film’s subordination to the painterly, in so much as in the film painting appears almost in a pure form, in a kind of Utopian attempt to treat the screen like a canvas or – better yet – to transport to the screen the expressivity of painting.
According to this interrelation, the works of Sebastian Burger may be considered – through their empirical and aesthetic investigations–‘pictorialist’ films which reveal ability and technique, bookended by ironic pauses, and offer, much in the same way as the work of Jean-Luc Godard, the possibility of a comparison between time in painting and time in cinema.

Curated by Domenico de Chirico.
Supported by Galerie Tobias Naehring.

Sebastian Burger - A song from under the floordboards
GRAND TOUR Studio, November 14 - December 5

Adrien Missika - Demain, Stabilisation, Galeria Francisco Fino

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Adrien Missika’s Demain, Stabilisation presents a body of work that draws on the artist’s continuous reflections on ecology, metabolism and our relationship with the environment. The exhibition includes a series of sculptural works that operate as narrative structures, combining diverse artistic strategies that explore humour within conceptual art perimeters, the subtlety of existential poetics through diagrammatic sculptures of light and a performative revision of archival practices as an open form. The very promise of the title, Demain, Stabilisation (tomorrow, stabilisation), announces a state of deferred accomplishment, implicating the present as an entropic zone where homeostasis is possible, yet always postponed, evoking the denialist responses to the current climate crisis.

The installation Better Safe Than Sorry takes the form of an open archive, including a series of custom-made soil bags shaped in concrete canvas, a patented material used for ditch lining and the construction of slopes or bunkers. Suggesting the form of a contaminated archive susceptible to mutation, each bag holds a rich quantity of soil, with one containing a variety of open pollinated seeds that can be collected by the visitor, inciting the cultivation and propagation of non-patented seeds. Treating soil as a rare earth material, each bag is unique in shape, some displaying cuts or intersections that allude to dissemination and potential accidental forms of fertilisation. At the same time, the work’s title reminds us of the preventive acts needed in times of severe change – as an example, the creation of the first seed bank in northern Norway, Vault.

The Relative Naive is a mechanic device for climate stabilisation that works through condensation and mist dispersal. Water is contained in a bottle attached to an apparatus for humidity extraction, representing a closed circuit. This witty prototype geo-engineering scale model, while underlining the absurdity of climatised spaces, represents the artificial conditions of conservation archives. It leaves the space with 50% humidity, providing an atmospheric relief in the gallery given the arrival of the rainy season. Directly addressing the urban planning efficiency systems and new thermodynamic strategies of cities, The Relative Naive reminds us that climate control comes from a position of fake neutrality, a class discriminatory attempt to erase discomfort for some, while creating other sorts of entropic responses. At the same time, the state of cool naiveté whispered by the alpine landscape on the logo of the Evian bottles does not exclude the cruel economy of bottled natural resources in an era of increased nature patenting.

Plus ou Moins (Psychometric Portrait) includes 12 wall sculptures of modified hygrometers inscribed with different personal emotions: from delusion, anxiety and belief to serenity and empathy. Switching psychrometrics – the measurement of humidity – with psychometrics  – the categorsation of mental capacities and processes  – we are taken through a survey of one’s mood swings and fragilities, and their fluctuations with the changing weather. These words can be read in the calligraphic inscriptions traced on the frontal parts of the hygrometers, leaving a subtle imprint of a human hand in this piece of industrial technology, where the measurements’ results depend, as if by magic, on the reaction of a hidden human hair. The perfected quality of the professional calligrapher mirrors that of an enchanted printer, or an industrial foreteller. We are introduced to a bionic gesture that appeals, as well, to a machinic subjectivisation of the viewer.

Colony Collapse Disorder comprises a series of neon sculptures with wiggly drawings that represent the choreographic movements bees enact while communicating the locations of their food supplies. However, in this series of irradiating light drawings, the diagrams are erratic and loose, representing shaky wavelengths and biased maps, suggesting that the species’ social architecture might be falling apart. As a fact, Colony Collapse Disorder is the name of a syndrome that communities of bees are suffering worldwide, and one that is leading to the threat of their extinction vis a vis their disorientation.

Text by Margarida Mendes.

Adrien Missika - Demain, Stabilisation
Galeria Francisco Fino, November 11 - January 11
www.franciscofino.com

Sayre Gomez - Déjà Vu, Ghebaly Gallery

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Sayre Gomez, Behind Door #2, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 84 x 120 inches, 213.4 x 304.8 cm

Sayre Gomez, Behind Door #2, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 84 x 120 inches, 213.4 x 304.8 cm

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Sayre Gomez, Six Seconds of Walt Disney’s Dumbo (The Bridge), 2017, Video loop, 6 sec

Sayre Gomez, Six Seconds of Walt Disney’s Dumbo (The Bridge), 2017, Video loop, 6 sec

Sayre Gomez, Behind Door #1, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 84 x 120 inches, 213.4 x 304.8 cm

Sayre Gomez, Behind Door #1, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 84 x 120 inches, 213.4 x 304.8 cm

Sayre Gomez, Legend, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 50 x 40 inches, 127 x 101.6 cm

Sayre Gomez, Legend, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 50 x 40 inches, 127 x 101.6 cm

Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 24 inches, 61 x 61 cm

Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 24 inches, 61 x 61 cm

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Installation view, Sayre Gomez, Déjà Vu, 2017

Across several new bodies of work, Gomez masterfully deploys trompe l’oeil painting techniques in a loose exploration of contemporary American subjectivity. The exhibition opens with a six second video loop from the 1941 Disney film Dumbo. An enraged captive gorilla shakes the bars of its cage and finds in shock that the bars of its prison are loose. Rather than freeing itself, it restores its cage in order to carry on its angry protest. The short looping video sets a tone of eternal return, prefacing several repetitions and recurrences throughout the exhibition.

Fences, closed doorways, and windows reappear across the show, indicating confinement and foreclosed opportunity. In a set of three paintings, a chain link fence comes into sharp pictorial focus, each backdrop falling into a distant blur. Unnervingly, an identical strand of ivy grows on each fence. The ivy, signifying the passage of time and the lapsing of human control over the environment, becomes a feature the viewer carries from scene to scene. Anchoring these street views are two large storefront doorway paintings, each rendered at one-to-one scale and overflowing with details of degradation and disuse. In one, a worn and faded vinyl layer depicting a tropical landscape blocks a view inside. In the other, scraps of paper cover the doorway from within, the last action of a quickly shuttered business. The storefront, an emblem of American opportunity, comes to stand as a painted closure, sealed before it was ever open.

The exhibition proceeds in a spiral, moving from exterior views to interior spaces, represented in a series of trompe l’oeil wood panel paintings. Simulating the surfaces of varnished wood panels marred by stickers in various stages of removal, Gomez creates psychologically charged works that comment on consciousness and identity formation. Assemblages of cultural attitudes, gender performances, class markers, and aesthetic statements, the works use stickers as avatars of identity. Individually insignificant, the stickers are substances that bind irreversibly with a surface and offer a collective, emergent view of the self.

This consideration of interiority is punctuated by an untitled painting, a confrontational, photorealistic portrait of a futuristic fighter pilot. The source image for this work was created by a fantasy illustration artist and posted to a military enthusiast website. By painting this computer generated soldier, Gomez offers it as another kind of sticker or ornament. The work reflects on the cooptation of a collective imagination, one in which power, violence, and domination are championed and perversely aestheticized.

Sayre Gomez - Déjà Vu
Ghebaly Gallery, October 14 - November 22
www.ghebaly.com

DAMA

Elif Erkan at Weiss Berlin, Berlin

Elif Erkan at Weiss Berlin, Berlin

Daniel Van Straalen at Hawaii-Lisbon, Lisbon

Daniel Van Straalen at Hawaii-Lisbon, Lisbon

John Wallbank at Arcade, London

John Wallbank at Arcade, London

Colin Penno at Berthold Pott, Cologne

Colin Penno at Berthold Pott, Cologne

Jonas Wijtenburg at Lily Robert, Paris

Jonas Wijtenburg at Lily Robert, Paris

Sebastian Burger at Tobias Naehring, Leipzig

Sebastian Burger at Tobias Naehring, Leipzig

Jimena Mendoza with Ajit Chauhan at Svit, Prague

Jimena Mendoza with Ajit Chauhan at Svit, Prague

Sinae Yoo at Neumeister Bar-Am, Berlin/Tel Aviv

Sinae Yoo at Neumeister Bar-Am, Berlin/Tel Aviv

Morgan Mandalay and Kim-Anh Schreiber at BWSMX, Mexico City

Morgan Mandalay and Kim-Anh Schreiber at BWSMX, Mexico City

Honza Zamojski at Leto, Warsaw

Honza Zamojski at Leto, Warsaw

Adam Cruces at Giorgio Galotti, Turin

Adam Cruces at Giorgio Galotti, Turin

Sasha Auerbakh at Pina, Vienna

Sasha Auerbakh at Pina, Vienna

Sam Smith - Live Performance

Sam Smith - Live Performance

Exhibiting Artists: John Wallbank, Colin Penno, Morgan Mandalay, Kim-Anh Schreiber, Adam Cruces, Daniel Van Straalen, Honza Zamojski, Jonas Wijtenburg, Sebastian Burger, Alexandra Noel, Sinae Yoo, Jimena Mendoza, Ajit Chauhan, Elif Erkan, Virginia Lee Montgomery, Sasha Auerbakh

Exhibitors: Arcade, London; Berthold Pott, Cologne; BWSMX, Mexico City; Giorgio Galotti, Turin; Hawaii-Lisbon, Lisbon; Leto, Warsaw; Lily Robert, Paris; Tobias Naehring, Leipzig; Neochrome, Turin; Neumeister Bar-Am, Berlin/Tel Aviv; Svit, Prague; Weiss Berlin, Berlin; Meyohas, New York; Pina, Vienna

Performance and Display: Sam Smith, Anna Franceschini, Diogo Evangelista, Guan Xiao, Laure Prouvost, Sasha Litvintseva.

DAMA - November 2 – 5, 2017
www.d-a-m-a.com

Anna Uddenberg - Sante Par Aqua, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler

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Hijacking tropes of femininity prevalent in consumer culture, Anna Uddenberg’s sculptures exaggerate expectations of fitness, flexibility and sexuality to the degree that the absurdity of collective fantasies and the unfeasible demands they place on the body become apparent. Uddenberg’s subjects, contorted into improbable poses, seem to bend under pressure to conform to hyper-gendered, heavily reinforced representations of female identity.

The artist’s new non-figurative work signals a shift in interest towards architectural space that also presents unrealistic ideals. Examples that speak with covert insincerity of “luxury,” “safety,” “wellbeing,” or “comfort” abound in the first-class cabins of airliners, on super yachts, in well-appointed automobile interiors and in transit spas with extravagantly bolstered massage chairs. As the artist has done with the body in her figurative work, here quasi-functional objects also distort and accelerate the formal and material qualities they are based on to rational yet surreal conclusions.

For her solo presentation at Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, three sculptures occupy the main space of the gallery, deployed in a small flotilla. Like strange ships they guard the back room, a harbor within which a sphinx-like flagship is at anchor. There, a veil of water walls shrouds the work in an illicit privacy, producing counterfeit serenity through endless sheets of synthetic rain. Spa, the short form of the exhibition title, Sante Par Aqua, helps name the gallery’s transformation, while the title’s literal translation, Health Through Water, is mockingly repudiated through the humorous skepticism in Uddenberg’s works.

Through Uddenberg’s lens, the alien future of HR Giger is already in our midst, not as a dystopian vision—dark, industrial and wet—but as a heterotopia of luxury, safety and wellbeing. For Michel Foucault the heterotopia is a space for the body in crisis “outside of all places […] absolutely other with respect to the places they reflect.” Foucault continues that, “the ship is the heterotopia par excellence,” floating, “from port to port, tack by tack, from brothel to brothel,” as not only a, “great instrument of economic development,” but also “simultaneously the greatest reserve of the imagination.”

Uddenberg’s often nautically inflected sculptures also operate as screenplays for potential performers to explore what these environments expect from us, investigating the possibility that we may live in a neo-Victorian era where what appears on the surface to be banal and prudish is in fact sexually charged. In these works, both the forms and meanings of familiar elements are reconfigured into new furniture-like sculptures; their cryptic functions assert unexpected scripts for the bodies that might occupy them. Furniture – so often the site of the body’s first encounter with capitalist commercial agendas – here becomes a proxy for architecture.

Anna Uddenberg’s methods allow her to infiltrate and rewrite the code of commercial products and environments, putting their concepts, shapes, aesthetics, and materials into new dialogues with one another. This process not only introduces complexity into the ways in which we interact with and interpret these sculptures, but also draws attention to how their ubiquitous source material affects our subject formation in daily life, while opening up rigid systems to new readings and suggesting new positions (both literal and metaphorical).

Text by David Tasman.

Anna Uddenberg - Sante Par Aqua
Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, November 4 - January 13
www.k-t-z.com

TRACY THOMASON - SYMBOLS, SIGNS AND SIGNALS, MARINARO

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Tracy Thomason, A Well and a Wealth or a Spine and it's Center, 2016

Tracy Thomason, A Well and a Wealth or a Spine and it's Center, 2016

Tracy Thomason, Batter Your Breasts With Your Fists, 2017

Tracy Thomason, Batter Your Breasts With Your Fists, 2017

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education understood to include everything that happens to us from the moment we enter this world of meaningful symbols, signs, and signals. – Linda Nochlin

Marinaro is pleased to present Tracy Thomason’s first New York solo exhibition, a series of textural paintings built from the slowness and layering of classical painting and sculptural material.

In Thomason’s work, paint and marble dust are hand-mixed into a clay-like material and carefully applied to linen surfaces. Layered in sequence with surgical precision, a mottled rocky ground forms over time, revealing themselves to have more in common with something remembered from the Cave of Forgotten Dreams or a chunk of washed up rubble on the beach.

The artist’s mark fluctuates between the quick stabs of stone carving tools, knife slices, and the gentle insistence of a powdery drawn line. Sculpted abstract glyphs are applied in meditation, snapping the works into graphic clarity from one painting to the next, developing an economy of form as language. These paintings are meant to be read in addition to being felt.

Thomason's paintings begin to mirror themselves through the doubling of form and
imagery. Drawing attention to the relationship between forms and negative space, denser shapes often reference the female body or summon nocturnal landscapes. Where one asserts itself as something of the corporeal, the same form acts as a period at the end of a sentence—a black hole to absorb your gaze. Flat color is a pause for contemplation and remembrance, reminding you where you are located.

Occupying a physical space the scale of a modest bathroom mirror or that of an oversized newspaper unfolded in completion, suggests the importance of looking and how to experience the world around us. In the 1970’s informational text, ‘Our Bodies, Ourselves’, women were encouraged to use a hand mirror as an exploratory tool, ‘take a mirror and examine yourself, after all you are your body and you are not obscene.” 

Tracy Thomason - Symbols, Signs and Signals
MARINARO, November 17 - December 22
www.marinaro.biz

Contribution by Timothy Hull. 

Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Vitaly Bezpalov, Represented as fleeing, for he has laid sacrilegious hands on the object once hallowed by life, 2017

Vitaly Bezpalov, Represented as fleeing, for he has laid sacrilegious hands on the object once hallowed by life, 2017

Lucia Leuci, Senza titolo creolo, 2017

Lucia Leuci, Senza titolo creolo, 2017

Michele Gabriele, Sleepy Spoony (Why don’t you go back to sell your fucking shaboo and leave us alone?), 2017

Michele Gabriele, Sleepy Spoony (Why don’t you go back to sell your fucking shaboo and leave us alone?), 2017

Dorota Gaweda & Egle Kulbokaite, YGRG 145, 2017

Dorota Gaweda & Egle Kulbokaite, YGRG 145, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, It was right / Even though it felt wrong, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, It was right / Even though it felt wrong, 2017

Alessandro Di Pietro, Bruce, 2017

Alessandro Di Pietro, Bruce, 2017

Jibril Esposito, Doublepenetration, 2017

Jibril Esposito, Doublepenetration, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Installation view, Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage, 2017

Inspired by the documentation modality used to describe an art work through its details, “Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage” is a project anchored to the idea that the Minor Circumstance of such images often exhibits the most material and fulfilling aspect of the object, letting visual pleasure have the best on the imaginary / imaginative concept of the artwork.
Obliged to relate to a restricted space, cynically sensual already, seven artists dialogued with the exhibition space cannibalizing an aesthetic that we all know and which we has been influenced and sometimes distracted in these years.
The hateful, common, coarse, and deplorable mistakes that inspired this project are essentially two: How does an installation view reveal of the project, the curatorial thought, and the gallerist ambitions? And how often does it only show the depressing interior designer ability of the curator and the proud complacency of rampant estate owner?
And when it comes to the artist: sure to choose from the dozens of photos of details the one that can best express the concept of the work, he is instead distracted as a child by the twinkle of a chromed metal, excited by the curve of a a form that reminds us some car advertising.
The art works are the center of any topic that interests art, but they are often misunderstood and then chosen for the most simplistic and approximate reasons.
The operation is simple and mocking. The viewer is made responsible.
Will he stop on a superficial and consolatory reading? Let him. Everything is in order and prepared for this to happen, because he does not bother too much and convinces himself that everything is fine.
Perhaps he would prefer to feel cuddled by those images he recognizes and loves. That he needs.
Satisfying and feticist images.

”A motorcycle continuously multiplies itself in all this shining and noise, capable of taking on new parts that are willing to be absorbed, and expanding itself to an unknown extent. But given this expansion, does the motorcycle remain what it used to be before? […]
If Thumbelina had to travel not on the back of the swallow but by a motorcycle, she would have hardly managed to keep her wedding dress and her tiny bows unrumpled. […]
The mutation can escalate to such an extent as to make it impossible to tell whether it is a parasitic outgrowth, hiding among the parts of the vehicle, or a vehicle that has become a parasitic virus of a weird shape that eludes the logic of functional driving.
It has become impossible to separate the parts from their bearer, because the bearer is now little more than a sum total of its constituent parts assembled in a somewhat random manner. The infinite expansion and annexation of yet more parts prompts an incessant renewal of the entire body. We are no longer sure which point in time and space we should select in order to be able to give a proper name to whatever it is that we are facing. […]
Will the multiplication of these surfaces and of their shine turn into the multiplication of their deceptions?
Or, taken to extremes, thus will detonate the logic of the vehicle from within, unleashing the powers previously hidden inside? Thumbelina landing happily on her swallow next to an elvish prince notices a brand new bike behind his back.”
(Natalya Serkova)

Dangerous double curve, the first to the left.

Curated by Something Must Break.
Exhibiting artists: Monia Ben Hamouda, Vitaly Bezpalov, Alessandro Di Pietro, Jibril Esposito, Michele Gabriele, Dorota Gaweda & Egle Kulbokaite, Lucia Leuci.

Assiette ou Virage et Dérapage
November 14