T293 IN RESIDENCE AT LUCIANO BRITO GALERIA

Tris Vonna-Michell, Registers, 2017

Tris Vonna-Michell, Registers, 2017

Tris Vonna-Michell, Registers, 2017

Tris Vonna-Michell, Registers, 2017

Claire Fontaine, Via Tribunali 293, (22.03.2010), 2010

Claire Fontaine, Via Tribunali 293, (22.03.2010), 2010

Fabian Herkenhoener, Light footed fire crackers (detail), 2017

Fabian Herkenhoener, Light footed fire crackers (detail), 2017

Fabian Herkenhoener, Light footed fire crackers (detail), 2017

Fabian Herkenhoener, Light footed fire crackers (detail), 2017

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

Martin Soto Climent, installation view

The ambiguous relationship between appropriation, authorship and ready-made object and the equally delicate one between language, personal narrative and collective history: these are the themes that Claire Fontaine, Fabian Herkenhoener, Martin Soto Climent and Tris Vonna-Michell will examine in the exhibition ’t twoninethree in-residence at Luciana Brito Galeria’.

In Claire Fontaine’s works, the denial of authorship and originality is asserted through the appropriation and  re-elaboration of symbols, objects and images of the contemporary art culture with the aim of investigating the consequences of Capitalism on our society. Surely one of the most iconic artworks by the Paris-based collective, Via Tribunali 293, 22.03.2010  is the copy of the keys of the historical Neapolitan venue of the gallery: the decision to exhibit these ordinary objects in a different gallery and potentially available to anyone, translates the intention of using art as a device for the analysis and critique of socio-political issues such as the concept of private property. In God They Trust it’s a U.S. quarter that has been cut in half and outfitted with a folding box cutter blade. Not detectable by security controls it becomes a weapon that, despite being simple and small, feeds a paranoid fear of a potentially omnipresent violence. Written text is another crucial element in the artistic practice of Claire Fontaine who, coherently with her social critique, presents the text May Our Enemies Not Prosper written on the occasion of another exhibition, held in another gallery in 2016, revolving around the themes of violence and the refugee crisis.

Authorship is also a key word in the practice of Fabian Herkenhoener, who decided to confront it through the literary technique of the ‘cut-up’. Proposed for the first time by poet Tristan Tzara during a surrealist rally in the 1920s, it consists in the deconstruction of a primary text using the random cutting up of words and phrases to form new sentences with a new logical sense. Herkenhoener’s interpretation of this technique leads to a ‘processing text’, an expression he invented to explain his artistic research in which a random language is enriched by a biographical dimension (since he is the author of some of the original texts) and by a visual one where words and phrases take geometric forms or invade the canvas as grid-like structures that are meant to emphasize the mental and emotional dynamics that generated them. On the occasion of this show, Herkenhoener will create wall-based works using texts he has been writing during a trip in California and Mexico on his way to São Paulo.

In his surrealist-like creations Mexican artist Martin Soto Climent exploits the transformative potential of everyday objects and found materials to create new poetic forms in which these elements assume a new and deeper symbolic role. Through conceptual artistic strategies such as appropriation and juxtaposition, these objects are gently reassembled into collages, installations and sculptures that, in their simplicity, appear ready-made. Soto Climent’s amazing skill of interpreting the site-specific and conferring softness and sensuality to objects through minimal intervention takes shape through wall-based works where old clothes become pictorial tools and act as colors, lines and geometries on the surface of the canvases. New ways of interacting with reality to suggest new perspectives.

Though many of the works by Tris Vonna-Michell have clearly autobiographical traits, these are not employed in order to authenticate or legitimize the wroks but rather assist in anchoring the multifaceted socio-political and cultural-historical constellations in which certain imagineries can be produced. A consummate storyteller, Vonna-Michell elaborately constructs tales that include historical research and social observation filtered through personal adecdotes. His works are always context-specific and are constantly modified through slights interventions to create what he terms a ‘narrative of the form’. The version of Registers specifically created for this exhibition consists of an animated sequence of slides taken during a trip to Japan in 2008. All slides were taken in transient spaces such as underpasses, viaducts, stations, docks and are re-assembled into an anachronistic narrative which forces the viewer to move constantly backwards and forwards in time. The unmistakable, fast-moving voice of the artist accompanies the sequence of images along with a soundtrack which is the result of a montage of musical compositions by Antwerp-based artist/musician Jan Matthé.

t twoninthree in-residence at Luciana Brito Galeria is the second stage of a successful collaboration with the Brasilian gallery that held an exhibition in Rome in June 2017 presenting works by Héctor Zamora, Pablo Lobato and Rafael Carneiro.

Exhibiting artists: Claire Fontaine, Fabian Herkenhoener, Martin Soto Climent, Tris Vonna-Michell.  

t twoninthree in-residence at Luciana Brito Galeria
August 5 - September 9
www.t293.it

AMALIA ULMAN - MONDAY CARTOONS, DEBORAH SCHAMONI

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Installation view, Amalia Ulman, Monday Cartoons, Deborah Schamoni

Amalia Ulman, Privilege 12/21/2015, 2016

Amalia Ulman, Privilege 12/21/2015, 2016

Amalia Ulman, Privilege 1/11/2016, 2016

Amalia Ulman, Privilege 1/11/2016, 2016

Amalia Ulman, Reclining Bob (Munich), 2017

Amalia Ulman, Reclining Bob (Munich), 2017

Amalia Ulman is presenting nine drawings of her ongoing series Monday Cartoons for her first show at Deborah Schamoni as well as new cartoons of Bob the Pigeon, which will be published in her forthcoming book, ‘A Job is a Job is a Job’.

Drawing became an integral part of Ulman’s practice in 2015, at the beginning of the US presidential election cycle, as one of the elements of her performance Privilege (2015-16) alongside photographs and videos. She taught herself to draw in order to satirize the single-panel (or ‘gag’) broadsheet cartoons of “failing” print outlets and cites the New Yorker’s Charles Barsotti as an important influence, as well as the Kastner and Partners ‘Red Bull Gives You Wings’ animations that comprise their twenty five year old energy drink campaign strategy.

Her drawings swoop from their pages to form part of her performance work Privilege started in October 2015 which follows on from her notorious instagram work, Excellences and Perfections. Both works toy with the staging and fabrication of identity but whereas in Excellences Ulman crafted a false persona based upon a lifestyle phenomenon she observed online, in Privilege she examines her own real aspirations and assumptions – those of a self-described South American “white-trash” woman, a feminist and a millennial ‘coastal elite’– and shines a light on the unbearable humiliation of being middle class. On the luxury of being white. The comforts of wealth and means are both romanticized and derided in a comedy of manners which exists not in the corridors of power, but in the cubicles of opportunity. Her protagonists, Amalia and Bob, ask us to consider who is in charge here? Are you in the business of cultural production? Well, take our card!

Bob, by the way, is a pigeon. A rock dove. The perfect urban underdog. But pigeons weren’t always the scourge of metropolitan society and have enjoyed many positions across history: messenger, meal, pet, sacrifice, sportsman and spy. The feral city pigeons of today are the descendants of refugees from long abandoned ‘dovecotes’ (traditional breeding houses introduced by the Romans to Britain, then later to mainland Europe), as reviled and Othered as any migrant or drifter.

The artist herself thinks of Bob as a kind of Holy Spirit (and pigeons are as pervasive as any manifestation of God, found everywhere on the planet except the polar icecaps) but in her work he waddles somewhere between being a personal assistant, confidante, trainee and lover. Ever the sidekick, never the boss.

As with previous projects she keeps to the confines of a strict colour palette – black, white and red. The template tones of white-collar news and propaganda, an austere rainbow of legitimacy. And as the performative aspects of labour shift from the cubicle to the cloud and middle-income inflation rises (but before all the robots take our jobs) Ulman asks us to consider our attitudes to the changing natures of work, caste, and lifestyle legitimacy from within (but pecking at) the traditional bounds of political visual communication.

To misquote Marvel Comics; with great draughtsmanship comes great responsibility. To wit, to woo.

Peace, bread and Bob. Pigeons united will never be defeated. 

Text by Ella Plevin.
Photography by Ulrich Gebert, all images copyright and courtesy of the artist and Deborah Schamoni, Munich.

Amalia Ulman - Monday Cartoons
eborah Schamoni, July 21 - September 19
www.deborahschamoni.com

OUT OF OFFICE - HAWAII-LISBON

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Installation view, Out of Office, Hawaii-Lisbon

Aujourdhui x Hawaii Lisbon - 4.jpg
Pedro Matos, Untitled (Juxtaposition) 5, 2017

Pedro Matos, Untitled (Juxtaposition) 5, 2017

[This is an automatic Out of Office reply]

Hello!

Thank you for contacting Aujourd’hui. 

We are at the moment Out of Office at HAWAII-LISBON. 

You may reach us on August the 5th from 3-8pm at our pop-up exhibition featuring works by Pedro Matos, Teresa Braula Reis and Ricardo Passaporte.

Also, on this day don’t miss your chance to get your hands on the new Aujourd’hui exclusive limited edition T-shirts whilst enjoying branded ice creams and refreshing cocktails.

For any urgent matters during our absence please contact HAWAII-LISBON on info(at)hawaii-lisbon(dot)com

The exhibition can be visited by appointment until August 26th.

Sunny regards, 
Aujourd’hui


Exhibiting artists: Pedro Matos, Ricardo Passaporte, Teresa Braula Reis.
Photography by Maria Rita, courtesy of the artists, Hawaii-Lisbon and Aujourd'hui.

Out of Office - Aujourd'hui on holiday at Hawaii-Lisbon
Hawaii-Lisbon, August 5th - August 26th
www.hawaii-lisbon.com

OLIVIER KOSTA-THÉFAINE - ARIA DI ROMA, VILLA MEDICI

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(…) I m going outside of the Villa to observe the details from the city-museum and abroad. There is what the tourist goes to see, with the help of his city guide, and what i decide to look at. Some little monuments composed with shells found on the beach try to compete with the Renaissance decorative conchs visible on Palace and fountains in the historic city center. A Pope face coffee mug, different types of cheap souvenirs gift for tourists. And everyday, a different decor, a sky with blazing colors :a painting from the Renaissance or a reproduction made in China of a Roman sky. An anti-intrusion fence reveal another potential and act as a pause time. A concrete block found in the Corviale take the name "Palazzo", while the precious wood from the big centenary pine is transformed into small furniture from the mass retail. Traces on city walls as much of "potential-paintings", some abandoned objects, found, collected into the Bosco or in San Vittorio. Aria di Roma is Neuilly-Sarcelles, both Versailles's suburbs told by flowers, and Ponentino, this refreshing gift coming directly from the suburbs…

- O.K-T, 2017

Photos by Pierluigi di Pietro.

Olivier Kosta-Théfaine - Aria Di Roma (part of in Swimming is Saving - curated by Chiara Parisi).
Villa Medici, July 13 - August 17
www.villamedici.it

Bora Akinciturk - We’re already dead, we just don’t know it yet, Ultrastudio

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Rage, 2017

Rage, 2017

Lyef, 2017

Lyef, 2017

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Devotion, 2017

Devotion, 2017

A 3d Keanu Reeves as Neo from The Matrix lies on a gurney, shirtless with electrodes attached to his chest and a transparent oxygen mask on his face. He’s in what looks like an emergency room. There are three nurses, two Asian women and a cartoon tiny winged donkey-man. Neo hears a text to speech bot whispering “What if he took both pills?” 
“He would lose all memory of what the Matrix is and who Morpheus and Trinity are and he would wake up in his pod, having no recollection of how he got there. He would then be rescued by people he did not recognise or had only seen in a dream. So – taking both pills would cause him to forget there even was a choice of pills to begin with.”
On the TV Ellen DeGeneres shows her audience this new invention from Japan, a vase like thing with both ends open. It’s something to shout into and it mumbles your scream. 
“I wish I had that on election night” she says. 
Crowd loves it, laughing ecstatically. 
Later she’s dancing with a plush mannequin to a slowed down version of Justin Timberlake’s “Rock Your Body” song. 
Crowd goes “Aww”
The moral of the story here is that pain becomes pleasure as pleasure becomes sadness. Or something like that. Time passes. And it’s just another system. Like Neo, if you take both pills you wake up from the Matrix unconscious. Awake without a purpose. A dog without a bone. Into this world you’re thrown.

Bora Akinciturk - We’re already dead, we just don’t know it yet
Ultrastudio, June 25 - August 20
www.ultrastudio.sexy

Azar Alsharif and Pedro Henriques - GOLDEN GRAIN, SYNTAX

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Azar Alsharif, Untitled, 2013 

Azar Alsharif, Untitled, 2013 

Pedro Henriques, Sharking, 2017 

Pedro Henriques, Sharking, 2017 

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Installation view, Golden Grain, Syntax

Pedro Henriques, Untitled, Precise Parts, 2015 

Pedro Henriques, Untitled, Precise Parts, 2015 

We find ourselves ingrained in a realm of abstracted representations. A tangible reality as we once knew it, has been rendered obsolete. It has shifted towards a virtual comprehension of our surrounding; it has been altered into a landscape, which has been gradually virtualised and post produced into supposedly real images of who we are and what we might, or already have become. The world’s surface has been covered by layers of such images ? flickering, illuminated and continuously circulating similes that now appear to be the world’s exterior coat. Reality was lost in the digital and the dj’d archive of its past, as has the idea of the authentic image, object or the remix of a true self. Contemporary representations of the real today, are representations of the equally non-real archival families of older and the already post produced depictions of initial objects/subjects, fabricated from the many times appropriated and the virtual, the reality of which, is now no longer at stake. “The tools of postproduction here are not made at achieving a representation of reality. They have become means of creating images and a world in their wake.”

Deep under the surface these images however still exist. Although archaic in form and in the singularity of their content, they now only endure as preconditions for their later becoming and transfigurations. Some have become new representations or backdrops, others have become victims of their own reconfiguration and translation, resulting in new hybridised settings or into three dimensional materialisations. It might feel dated. After all it is an exhibition of images, of representations and of small realities, the misplacement, replacement and transformation of which however, serves us as a tool, allowing us to question contemporary principles of representation, the abstraction of appearance and the speed of disappearance.

Curated by Markéta Stará Condeixa.
Photos by Bruno Lopes. 

Azar Alsharif and Pedro Henriques - Golden Grain
Syntax, July 7 - September 23
www.syntaxproject.org

HUBERT MAROT - GOING­-GONE, Galerie Anne de Villepoix

You could see here a direct reference to Michel Foucault's "androgynous images," which he defined in his text called Photogenic painting, written in 1975 for Gérard Fromager's monographic catalogue. These images combine mediums and categories, and bear testimony to the free relationship between photography and painting. Such is the very substance of Hubert Marot's work in his exhibition GOING­GONE. His first cyanotypes already conjugated photographic process with pictorial rendition. Here, his latest series introduces color as an element of variation, allowing a shift from negative to task. Color appears, driving the rhythm and, little by little, becomes the subject.

Around this queen­Image, whose nuances vary depending on the application time of the liquid emulsion, there is a whole ecosystem of ceramics in enamel, which has also stood the test of time. They turn into solid objects a state of evolution, of degradation. Hybridity still rules, hubcaps melt and become clocks, and scooter seats, lacerated and mended, become, once hung up on the wall, a series of ancient masks.

There is then, in its very technicality, in the invariability of the dried out result, a contained and sealed process of alteration. If matter is adorned with color variations, the intention is entirely focused on time, what it allows, what it dilates, what it forgets. In this work of patience, a softening phenomenon occurs. Before it is fixed, matter has distended, like the close­up of the chewed­up chewing gum on the canvas prints, the ceramics have become limp, waiting for time to pass. A metallic structure, built like a bus shelter, hosts a looped projection of anonymous men who have the patience to rub their car's bodywork until it shines, another reminiscence that this is all, once again, about the passing of time.

We feel like we're in a slow motion movie, in a vinyl record set to the wrong number of turns per minute. In the seriality and repetition of the objects presented here, seats, hubcaps, images, there is the same mechanics as in the mastication of chewing gum, the same fatality, the same latency. And yet, what saves everyone from being swallowed by this great machine is, in the end, the un­reproductability of this work. In "each moment in time is unique" there is "each process is unique," and therefore each result. Repetition doesn't rob the image of its singularity, on the contrary, it allows it to vary in its unicity through gesture, for the obsession with reproduction is also the obsession with its failure. An outrageously oiled machinery.

Text by Elisa Rigoulet.

Hubert Marot - GOING-GONE
Galerie Anne de Villepoix, July 1 - September 2
www.annedevillepoix.com

PEDRO BARATEIRO - SEQUEL, BASEMENT ROMA

Pedro Barateiro_Relaxed Algorithm 2_courtesy the artist_photos by Roberto Apa.jpg

Mythologies are dead, they have always been. But even as corpses, they’ve been used as political strategies to manipulate fiction and facts. Fictional narratives have defined culture, its historicity, its legacy. Drama. Goosebumps visible in our skin. Chills. The amplification of the voice. The soundtrack of the film. Attitudes change. Behavioral patterns change, adapting to new forms of recognition. The stream of our social media accounts translated by ignorant algorithms. Liquid and opaque forms of identity. The movements of the body. The most superficial of all gestures can never be taken lightly, even if it tries hard to be disguised with bright colors, with feathers and fumes.

A year ago, exactly on the same date of the opening of this exhibition at BASEMENT ROMA, I arrived in Los Angeles. I had never been to the city, and to me L.A. represented the geographical point of the production of what is called the spectacle, a sort of dead-end or end point of Western civilization. The amount of fiction written for films, tv and all sorts of shows that come from there, generates an overproduction of narratives that intend to alienate the spectator while mixing and re-creating personal and historical moments. The entertainment business is a form of capitalist production that alters our perspective on the events happening around us. For example, the way politics is represented in fiction is, in many cases, deprived of ethics. And it continues to do so through an ever growing network of mythologies.

If we think carefully on the process of how narratives and mythologies travelled from Ancient Greece, re-interpreted through Rome, we can analyze the process of how culture in the West has been produced, how philosophy, fiction writing, poetry, music and the visual arts, have transformed themselves as part of a capitalist machine. The mass production of images, the representation of the human body, the representation of nature on Western culture changed quite drastically since early capitalism. Under forms of appropriation and colonization, our interactions within the available communication systems are surveilled and monitored. Our exchanges are now translated into big data.  And data has now surpassed oil as the most valuable resource in the world, and we are all contributing with different types of content.

The goal of fiction today is to pretend that there is a continuation, that the grand narrative never dies. Season after season of endless stories that colonize our lives. Our brains have been programmed to accept Trump as president via Frank Underwood in House of Cards. Our imagination was colonized so we could accept that type of person as a political figure.

The title I gave this exhibition, Sequel, refers to the disbelief of Western traditions of narrative and representation in the moment we’re living. But I need to ask myself and you: how can our imagination resist? How can we stop our imagination from being colonized by these myths? What can art and thought do facing these forms of fictional politics? What is left for us to write? Are we supposed to resist this endless present of small narratives that hide the big narratives of capital? Should we think about an ecology of production of data, an ecology of immaterial labour?

In her book, The Responsibility of Fiction Writing in Neoliberal Capitalist Societies (Duvida Press, 2014), writer Leonora Jones talks about the necessity of awareness in the growing use of text in our communications, specially in the interactions in social media, and how data is used, transformed and profited by capital, as it manifests the exposure and altered states of subjectivity produced within a neoliberal post-capitalist society. Along with the growing abstraction of value and human interactions, new forms of passivity, of spectatorship and consumption require a response to new models of action and community. The apparent fluidity of circulation and distribution are represented by a materiality that is not fixed. Jones asks: “How can we represent a state of constant transformation, if it changes shape at any moment, like an ecosystem needs to adapt and mutate to the surrounding environment?” And she continues: “We should act in a form of conscious resistance, not as passive spectators”. Jones mentions Naomi Klein’s NO LOGO (Picador, 1999) and her take on Milton Friedman, who Klein claims to be “the architect of the global corporate takeover”. Jones underlines her idea with the fact that Klein illustrates this chapter of her text with footage of two members of the activist group Biotic Baking Brigade, who threw a pie at Milton Friedman, when the economist was leaving a corporate conference in San Francisco in 1998.

Curated by João Mourão and Luís Silva.
Photos by Roberto Apa.

Pedro Barateiro - Sequel
BASEMENT ROMA, June 28 - August 30
www.basementroma.com

And if I left off dreaming about you? - FOOTHOLD

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And if I left off dreaming about you?
– When you woke up this morning, you found the world largely as you left it. You were still you; the room in which you awoke was the same one you went to sleep in. The outside world had not been rearranged. History was unchanged and the future remained unknowable. You woke up to reality. But what is reality?
– An ambivalent opposition between what I know and what exists regardless of my cognition. In other words, does reality exists per se beyond my mind, my eye and my experience, or is it ontologically non-existent, so is it an illusion, or rather, a dream?
– I secretly think reality exists so we can speculate about it.

Reality needs to feed itself on fictions, because the reality of the world is never enough for human being. It is even less relevant within the technological, visual and iconographic landscape in which we are now immersed, a space where fictionality has acquired a special ability to become real and to erase the originals, of which it is a representation in a perpetual kaleidoscope effect. The image, as reproduction and representation of reality, confirms its inherent and insidious falsehood.
The gaze, in its interpretation of reality, is increasingly technologically mediated and as such also false, deceptive and producer of new simulacra. Hyperreality is as uncertain as dream, which is dreamed like the dreamer who dream himself, and so on.
– In the dreamer’s dream, the dreamed one awoke.
The hypertrophic nature inherent the new anthropological spaces of collective intelligence exalts states of subjectivation created by the hybridization of real and fictious, in which is manifested the collapse of the imaginary over reality. We are witnesses of a technological migration – from fantasy to effectuation, with implications concerning the consistence of our co-existence in daily life experience. 
The universe of dreams that until yesterday resided in the psychic, emotional and private dimension of man, has currently lost its secrecy, can be easily communicated and shared with others, can become common experience beyond linguistic tool. Everything can be objectified, represented, made alive. Our technological body carries a whole world, an environment in which to thrive, express, grow and to gain strength. And if this happens, the dogma of the uniqueness of reality  tarts to waver: “Self crushing” brings with it the plurality of the worlds. Parallel universes have left sci-fi books and the most daring cosmological hypotheses of quantum physics to become next-door worlds, which you can enter and exit with extreme ease. Our social behavior moves into a narrative universe where the flesh no longer needs redemption, because it has already become virtual; body of light. In this perspective, the universe surrounding us becomes the corpus hermeticum of new fanta-technological and para-spiritual mythologies, which describe new collective representation/identification criteria, not only in psychological terms but also in terms of sensory apperception. New technologies enable us to live the corporeity in a new, immaterial, psychological and philosophical form, something similar to the ghost-like and miraculous form traditionally attributed to ancient saints, ascetics and shamans; in this sense, technology allows us to live a sort of unsettling “journey into the spirit”, which in its original form is characterized – according to ancient traditions – by the dreamlike coincidence between the subject and the object of knowledge, and by the immersion into a sort of transcendental identification with the world. Here, then, electronics – which didn’t allow us to get to Mars – allows us to live this dream collectively, giving it a metaphysical (or speudo-spiritual) body which turns out to be totally credible, engaging, immersive and interactive.

All we got left is figuring out why there is today a widespread, and increasingly obsessive, eagerness for evanescent worlds, a feverish desire to project ourselves, at least illusorily, into the rarefied world of non-things. A world that, in today’s collective imagination, takes on the form of phantasmagorization. Because, although things in that dreamy world lose their materiality, the resulting non-things are still lived as simulacra of things. Or rather: as if they were bodies without bodies. Ghosts of bodies. Ghosts of things.

Exhibiting Artists: Stine Deja, Gioia Di Girolamo, Motoko Ishibashi , Lito Kattou, Botond Keresztesi, Maurizio Vicerè.
Curated by Like A Little Disaster.

And if I left off dreaming about you?
FOOTHOLD, June 18 - August 18

NEW DAWN - NEUMEISTER BAR-AM

New Dawn presents the work of 9 artists whose approach to painting can be traced to a shared concern for the pictorial, and its recent fracture into the digital divide. The works span a range of mediums from traditional painting to algorithmically assisted drawing. In the presentation of the show a suspended painting in the centre of the gallery acts as both a barrier and gateway, where history is quite literally embedded in the contemporary. Across all works in the show, from the early 20th Century to the present, a shared concern can be traced to the balance struck at the dawn of abstraction and its relationship to documentary nature of the image itself.

To serve this purpose a widescreen format minimalist landscape painting by Priscilla Tea is suspended in the centre of the space, a verso recto display that includes the work of 20th Century constructivist Walter Dexel. Mounted in the internal framework on the rear side of the landscape, this presentation serves as a motif between the passage of progeny and progenitor, seeking to abandon distinctions of the old and the new. Perhaps suggesting each addition to the canon of painting occurs as a layer upon what was. At face value we are presented with Tea’s bleak and meditative landscape, equal parts virtual and actual, sweeping between a GPS style rendering and a desert scene in nuanced measures. Mounted inside it we find a piece born of the essence of geometric enquiry in the work of Dexel, perhaps to illustrate in no uncertain terms that painting is in fact, like a server rack or a CPU, loaded in to even the most contemporary iterations of itself. The pure scale of Tea’s work also affords the addition of other works hung inside of it and here a third relationship is made. Presented here is the photographically produced, but painterly informed work of Kate Steciw, forming a concise geometric relationship to the Dexel piece. Here artists across 100 years of time respond to similar conditions but with different tools, itself a cyclic metaphor for the passing of one day into another.

Text by Ry David Bradley.
Exhibiting artists: Ry David Bradley, Walter Dexel, Harm van den Dorpel, Kalle Lindmark, Jonas Lund, Jeffrey Alan Scudder, Kate Steciw, Steciw/de Joode, Priscilla Tea. 
Curated by Domenico de Chirico and Neumeister Bar-Am.

New Dawn
Neumeister Bar-Am, June 24 - July 29
www.neumeisterbaram.com

Yuri Pattison - Trusted Traveller, Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Installation view, Yuri Pattison, Trusted Traveller, 2017

Co-working spaces, newsrooms as factories for the post-factual era and logistics centres of online megastores are the focus of interest of Irish artist Yuri Pattison (*1986, lives in London). Pattison’s artistic world, which includes routers, humidifiers, surveillance cameras, office plants and cheap replicas of design classics, moves between the sculptural and digital and plays with control mechanisms. With his immersive, multimedia installation «Trusted Traveller» Yuri Pattison is transforming Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen into a projection surface for the contemporary world. By intervening as a programmer he spectacularly confronts the public with spaces, materials and themes that define today’s reality.

The title «Trusted Traveller» already indicates the focus that Pattison is setting for his Sankt Gallen exhibition: on the one hand it deals with the theme of ‘travelling’ and its required infrastructure, but also with the phantom of a globalised world as a place without borders. The installation he has created for the Kunst Halle consciously refers to the most symbolic and today also perhaps the most complex of all places connected with travelling: the airport. The artist stages an ‘architectonic framework’ that not only brings to mind an airport as a metaphor, but also as the location of paranoia, isolation and fiction. With materials charged with meaning and the precise setting of objects Pattison succeeds in allowing a homogenous and realistic world to emerge at Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, without giving in to the temptation of hyperrealism.

A network of cable ducts will hover over the heads of exhibition visitors. With the controlled use of light as well as with special visibility filters the artist will very precisely guide their gaze. Several films on monitors show model worlds. They were built as a staging for nationalistic requirements (e.g. world-famous buildings and monuments) or designed as locations for entertainment (Japanese amusement arcades that look like backdrops for video games). Pattison sees contemporary people as navigating between such poles — in a world that seems to be losing itself between idealisation and economisation. It is therefore no wonder that identification documents are also an important component of the «Trusted Traveller» exhibition, especially invented passports such as the World Passport and the Camouflage Passport. Passports are in fact perfect projection surfaces and simultaneously precisely connoted objects in which many concepts meet. Here personal identity meets designated political borders; print techniques merge with biometric movement surveillance thanks to microchips and nationalist bureaucracy collides with the utopia of unlimited freedom.

Photos by Gunnar Meier.

Yuri Pattison - Trusted Traveller
Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, May 20 - August 6

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces - Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Gabriele Beveridge, Skimming the daydream, 2017

Gabriele Beveridge, Skimming the daydream, 2017

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces, 2017, installation view, Galerie Eva Meyer

Where the I-world relationship, understood as a nucleus of phenomenological thinking, takes on the character of intentionality, it becomes necessary to investigate pure consciousness that allows the realisation of the totality of subjective and world experience.
The German word Erlebnis, translated with the expression “lived experience” or “living,” indicates the personal and unitary aspect for which the contents of consciousness are not passively taken but acquired in a living way in the flow of it.
Because of its dynamic nature, Erlebnis has been considered to be the essential condition for capturing all that is life, whether it is the individual, historical, artistic, religious, etc. which escape the purely definitive methods of natural sciences.
And so it is in sharp contrast with certain positivistic reductions that consider this relationship as a simple physiological, mechanical and associative process. As Edmund Husserl states, “the crisis of science comes from the fact that the original sense of experience has been lost, that is, the intuitive experience of the ‘world of life’ which is the perceived perceptual world.”

Far from any associative and behaviorist setting and out of psychic content, this kind of subjectivity of personal experience is ideally oriented to investigate, shape, and define the identity of the image as a way to reconfigure our sensory experience of vision.
Such an experiential approach is perhaps the ideal one to take in front of a work and what appears to in play in Alluring shapes, tempting spaces is the experience of a series of references to Erlebnis, an internal game between the works on display, an Erlebnis ping-pong, as if the hand had disappeared before completing the form or even as if it had never disappeared while keeping it in the hollow of a space that becomes hostile: this makes these figures, perpetually in tension (Tempting), exhaling a stimulating (Alluring) past experience but still in the itinerary.

The presence of iconic elements and recognisable cultural references emphasises such an approach as it marks the difference between procedural experience and possible pre-established schemes, denouncing the flow of Erlebnis outside these. The central pivot of this thematic constellation is the question of the relationship between the formal and material components of the cognitive process that evolves from the binomial into a single sensorial experience.

Exhibiting artists: Adriano Amaral, Gabriele Beveridge, Nicolas Boulard, Manuel Burgener, Adriano Costa, Michel De Broin, François Durel, Rubén Grilo, Andy Meerow, Oren Pinhassi, Gerda Scheepers.
Curated by Domenico de Chirico.

Alluring shapes, tempting spaces
Galerie Eva Meyer, June 2 - July 22

representative representative - rod barton

Representation is a big word and it gets exponentially bigger when it itself is represented. Like multiplying by negatives, an absence of an absence constructs an index of an index. What would that look like?

Rod Barton presents the group show “representative representative” bringing together the works of Tom Król, Ryan Cullen, Isabel Alicia Baptista and Malte Zenses. The show, running from 15th June - 21st July 2017, will feature the cross cultural dialogue present in each artists visual practice through the contextual exchange and decrypted encryption of the pop-culture trace, physical structure and definition of the surface. The artists, having worked together since 2013, exchanging ideas via a rhythmic process of dialogue and a shared interest in the nature of representation to obscure and replace entities by others that can be seemingly unrelated. A process of building shortcuts to nothing.

For all four artists, the importance of imagery that slides across the foundations that make up dialogue is paramount. Drawing on folklore, limbs, language, initials amongst other disparate snatches of fragmented visual conversation, each artist place themselves in the space between narrator and historian; collector and creator, linguist and translator. Drawing lines of distinction between that which conceals and that which replaces, the pieces take on the role of a gallery based QR code, form without content while at the same time being only content without form.

The show highlights the use of both partitions and supports to separate and elevate content in order to sharpen contexts down to a finite point. These structures are about preventing the collapse of the pieces and holding the literal weight of the material against creating a collapse of the white cube.

Exhibiting artists: Isabel Baptista, Ryan Cullen, Tom Krol, Malte Zenses.

Representative representative
Rod Barton, June 15 - July 21
www.rodbarton.com

NINA BEIER - MAN, STANDARD (OSLO)

“Look down upon my shame,
The cruel wrong that racks my frame,
The grinding anguish that shall waste my strength,
Till time’s ten thousand years have measured out their length!
He hath devised these chains,
The new throned potentate who reigns,
Chief of the chieftains of the Blest. Ah me!
The woe which is and that which yet shall be
I wail; and question make of these wide skies
When shall the star of my deliverance rise.
And yet-and yet-exactly I foresee
All that shall come to pass; no sharp surprise
Of pain shall overtake me; what’s determined
Bear, as I can, I must, knowing the might
Of strong Necessity is unconquerable.
But touching my fate silence and speech alike
Are unsupportable. For boons bestowed
On mortal men I am straitened in these bonds.
I sought the fount of fire in hollow reed
Hid privily, a measureless resource
For man, and mighty teacher of all arts.
This is the crime that I must expiate
Hung here in chains, nailed ‘neath the open sky. Ha! Ha!”

– Aeschylus: “Prometheus Bound”, ca. 430 B.C.E

Images courtesy of the artist and STANDARD (OSLO), Oslo. Photos by Vegard Kleven.

Nina Beier - Man
Standard (Oslo), June 2 - July 1
www.standardoslo.com

Sophie Reinhold - Can I change my mind?, Galerie Tobias Naehring

08_Sophie_Reinhold_Galerie_Tobias_Naehring_2017.jpg

There is no better place on earth to become one with yourself than the bathtub. So much that you never wish to get out. Or get back in as soon as possible. At least that’s how I feel. I take a bath every day. Sometimes even two. Starting your day with a full bath is so different than jumping into the shower. Win- ding down in a full bath at the end of the day is so different from going straight to bed and falling asleep. Bathtub: it’s a transition zone between night and day; it’s an interface of different states. But most of all it’s a place for becoming-one-with-yourself, a moment where hard edges dissolve. Home – for me it isn’t the four walls of an apartment; Instead home is: Your own body slipping into the warm water of a tub, where ever that tub may be. Tub – shell, not prison; tub – cocoon, not box; body enveloped by water, enveloped by a tub – that’s me with myself.

Looking at Sophie Reinhold’s paintings – I believe to recognize bathtubs. That is the oval, rounded, and sometimes kidney-formed shapes appear as such. I imagine these forms to be the paintings’ dormant power centers, and that the other elements in them, in all there disparateness, seem to self-evidently concur: the abstract and angular shapes, the free-hand lines, the figurative elements – naked man, na- ked woman, breast and dick.

Bathtub or shower – it’s a frame of mind. It makes all the difference. A shower is shock; a bathtub is acceptance. Bathtub means: the will for water as a state and outlook – flexible and open, yet always self-contained; hovering and gliding, but always one with itself. Not the language of exclusivity, but that of intensity. Intensity is something that simultaneously binds and opens: the manifestation of concentra- ted overflowing, the moment of being one-with-yourself in more-than-one. To become one with yourself means: to open yourself to the day, the world, to others. This isn’t only true for bathtubs, it’s the same for images, the same for paintings (the same for these images, the same for these paintings): You can glide into them; you can almost physically sink into them and find yourself in them, in others. Diving into the world, facing it. Believe it or not. I do.

Text by Dominikus Müller.

Sophie Reinhold - Can I change my mind?
Galerie Tobias Naehring, June 3 - July 8
www.tobiasnaehring.de

Pakui Hardware - On Demand, Exile

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

Pakui Hardware, On Demand, 2017, Installation View, EXILE

The battery dies at 30 %, again. Mischieving nature compressed to gadget, performing things on its own, clogging seamless communication. Cut off from the network, a body reclines on spring grass while staring into a starless sky. Across blue-hued layers are other bodies, unreachable but abundant with recourses, asteroids, like lonely gas stations reverberating in immense space. Bodies in landscapes. One – on the spring grass with a dead phone battery. Others – in scapes beyond human comprehension. Bodies as landscapes provide recourses for expansion. Transformed by technology, wired for efficiency. Bodies who have never yet met, but are already connected through capital and high-res images of their bodily surfaces. Distant surfaces – the dead phone’s screen savers.

Pakui Hardware - On Demand
Exile, June 1 - July 15
www.exilegallery.org

A Highly Dazed World - Daily Lazy Projects

highlydazed 5c.jpg

How do we break from these simulatory boundaries provided within this millennial world? How can one be liberated or emancipated from the bind of digital life. Would it be too romantic to argue that one truly only lives on the edge when encountering the unpredictable or the uncanny, in danger or on the brink of death? Shouldn’t life announce itself through the dynamism of feeling, passion and the direct experience of the present? Can this simulatory world that is rendered through the digital supplement our new highly dazed world?
Has digitalization acted as a numbing agent against mans inhibition to be human? For mans dependency to encounter accidents and to live a full life in the bliss of this highly dazed world? This world we live in allows us to live in a simulatory gaze, moving from algorithm to algorithm, from post to post. As early as Martin Heidegger the accolade of technology has been perceived as an anaesthetic for man, saving man from his innate dependency to find fate and accident, instead finding binary fact and tangible truth. Heidegger then questions our shifting position on this planet, questioning whether we are becoming devoid of a biological prerequisite for sunlight, storing energy through alternate forms? Has man found a new form of digital alchemy? Is this highly digitalized world a new formula for anthropological perpetual motion?
When placing an artwork in a gallery environment, a public space, one is shifting the works ontological matter, thus shifting its value. The artwork is becoming a form of consumed commodity, just like anything else. Yet there is a difference between an artworks commodity purpose, and other commodity purposes. Other commodities tend to have a ticking life spans, inducing a form of ephemerality, such as buying a new computer, a pair of Nike Air Max 95’s or even a pint at the bar, as man is really only looking for the next best thing, a more refined model. Yet the commodity value of an artwork differs due to two reasons: firstly its cognitive value, whereby we acquire knowledge of a work through thought experience and sense. Secondly an artworks value to induce through contemplation, the archetypal ‘consumption/ destruction’ paradigm shifts whereby an artwork is not consumed in a gallery setting yet is observed and contemplated and in most cases do not have an ephemeral quality. This same action exists when an artwork is uploaded onto the internet, again another form of public realm, when a work as been uploaded it has been commoditised, placing it in a sphere where everything happens, from purchasing a ticket to observing capital market flows, or even watching porn, yet again all disposable actions. Therefore in this setting artistic activity becomes ‘normal’ or standardized, art returns to its origins as a utility purpose, refusing to differ from anything else within the ether. Therefore within this highly dazed world does everything just amalgamate into one form, under the pretence of an algorithm? Have we become comfortably numb? Or is there still space for the individual grow? 

Text by Hugo Wheeler.

Exhibiting artists: Stephan Backes, Stefania Batoeva, Robin von Einsiedel, Stelios Karamanolis, Isaac Lythgoe, Yves Scherer, Yorgos Stamkopoulos

A Highly Dazed World
Daily Lazy Projects, May 26 - July 15

Monia Ben Hamouda & Michele Gabriele - It won’t only kill you, it will hurt the whole time you’re dying

Michele Gabriele, “TurboPizza (Best and Worst of me)”, 2017

Michele Gabriele, “TurboPizza (Best and Worst of me)”, 2017

Michele Gabriele, “TurboPizza (Best and Worst of me)”, 2017

Michele Gabriele, “TurboPizza (Best and Worst of me)”, 2017

Installation view

Installation view

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Holding Hands as a Cup”, 2017 (detail)

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Holding Hands as a Cup”, 2017 (detail)

Michele Gabriele, “The Anteater (No One Needs to Talk with this Old Ugly Bitch)”, 2017

Michele Gabriele, “The Anteater (No One Needs to Talk with this Old Ugly Bitch)”, 2017

Installation view

Installation view

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Please Wake Up Subtitle”, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Please Wake Up Subtitle”, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Please Wake Up Subtitle”, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Please Wake Up Subtitle”, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Still Broken”, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Still Broken”, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Still Broken”, 2017

Monia Ben Hamouda, “Still Broken”, 2017

When things die we realize what they once were,
One ring of smoke pulsating in space
One moon hanging in the air of a stuffy night on the cusp of nothing
Apex vitality
Trash collectors screamlaugh like demons behind the rusting black gate over the rumble of
their V8s over their hand-soldered Cumbia FM radio, riding the tendrilled cloud of curdled
milk and mildew beer and rainsoaked oil spattered cardboard, rotting in the sunlight
This arid mudpatch once birthed amphibianism
Now we trample orchids dilated flinching under explosions curled fetal digging shallow
holes, hands clinched, pants-pissing screaming power-hungry control-mad sunburning on
the dented roof of an old desert Audi
Our moment might soon be over
I want to lose myself forever in a sublime haze of loud distracting life-affirming anything
A shaky pistol emerging from a shadow
Dogs disappear out windows
Forceful sliding glass doors guillotining tails off of common lizards
Boiled grey meat, recreational banging, awaiting final bipedal opi
Draw an x over the vein on your temple with a black marker
Immolate entertainment
A deep scar scraped into the lateral line of your Led Zeppelin red convertible, Mardi Gras
beads asunder, the taste of collegiate decadence propelling our tongues
A bag of orange rocks shattered into crude clay sludge
Lost without our stupid thin and self-reflective technology in the suffocating bearhug of
nature’s icy indifference, crying, frozen, desperate phonecalls to Mom go to voicemail
No theatre, no lights, a thing was and is now not, against rationality, comprehensive, inert
Also there is no way to know things until we learn them
Things like the slow lunging beauty of nighttime, glistening, revealing itself thin and rich
and layered like the veiny tonality of bat wings
The lèse-majesté of the horizon, the sunset
Every pore is a temple!
What are we even scared of?
Clumped in a flesh heap in the bottom of a mud covered shower expelling ions
An edge of foam between wet and dry sand where the base of all life forms.
A frothy smelly mustard perfect line, where the means and ends of our bones and hopes
are picked apart by crustaceans
What are we waiting for?

Text by Andrew Birk.

Monia Ben Hamouda & Michele Gabriele - It won’t only kill you, it will hurt the whole time you’re dying
OJ Art Space, May 20 - June 10

Emily Roysdon - scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Installation view, Emily Roysdon, scenic, say, Kunsthalle Lissabon

Emily Roysdon, Uncounted, 2015

Emily Roysdon, Uncounted, 2015

Queer history and social space have always interested Emily Roysdon generating an interdisciplinary working method with projects taking the form of performances, photographic installations, print making, texts, videos, curating and collaborations. Her notions about what it is ‘unseen in time’ and the politics of transitions had recently formed Uncounted, a site-specific project that has unfolded over several years through a series of related questions and visual vocabulary. At the core of the project is a 23 part text that engages a vocabulary of movement, margins and trespass. Drawing on texts by W.H. Auden, David Hammons and Gertrude Stein, the work considers “uncounted experience,” what is “beyond the will to measure,” posing such questions as “What is time if not activism?” and “What instruments have we?”

For scenic, say Roysdon is moving on from these 23 short pieces, which are by turns abstract, poetic and political, into a more personal project. At Kunsthalle Lissabon Roysdon uses photography to deepen a sense of loss in relationship to the aliveness of time. Using the theatrical tropes of perspective and prosceniums Roysdon exhibits variations of the dynamics between movement, image, stage, alive and lost. Through photography, printmaking and installation the exhibition combines gridded mural sized images with collaged silver gelatin works. These analog prints, also screen printed, are standing in the room, off the wall, in order to present the performative contrast between the image strategies and share the commitment of the artist to reanimate in scale the social space.

The sense of loss is further depicted via a need of a horizon which rests quietly in the photographs. The images appear unfinished, uneven, linking the idea of the before and the after. Roysdon’s text Uncounted echoes in scenic, say as fragments of that work are screen printed in the collaged works. In scenic, say Emily Roysdon shows her research into what is lost in time and how this is staged and memorialized. Thinking through death and theatre she offers the public a poetic glance of her personal, abstract and political imaginary.

Photos by Bruno Lopes.

Emily Roysdon - scenic, say
Kunsthalle Lissabon, May 20 - September 2
www.kunsthalle-lissabon.org